Session Title

Rethinking Reform IV: Textual Perspectives on Monastic Reform and the Secular Clergy

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Episcopus: Society for the Study of Bishops and Secular Clergy in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Maureen C. Miller, William L. North

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley, Carleton College

Presider Name

John S. Ott

Presider Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Paper Title 1

Elisabeth of Schönau’s Call to the Clergy: Clerical Education and Reform in the Twelfth Century

Presenter 1 Name

Sarah Spalding

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Catholic Univ. of America

Paper Title 2

Walkelin, William, Winchester: A Reappraisal of Reform

Presenter 2 Name

Justin Haar

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 3

Reformed Monasticism and the Narrative of Cistercian Beginnings

Presenter 3 Name

Martha G. Newman

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Maureen C. Miller

Start Date

11-5-2013 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

Research on reform in the eleventh and twelfth centuries has, for some time now, expressed dissatisfaction with our standard narratives of this period in ecclesiastical history. But new, broad interpretations have not yet emerged. Building on the discussions begun in our 2012 panels, this session includes papers analyzing reform in specific 11th- or 12th-century texts, focusing especially on regular clergy and their visions of reform of secular clergy. Respondents have been asked to consider, What sort of narrative of reform would best accommodate the evidence of this source? - John S. Ott

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May 11th, 3:30 PM

Rethinking Reform IV: Textual Perspectives on Monastic Reform and the Secular Clergy

Bernhard 213

Research on reform in the eleventh and twelfth centuries has, for some time now, expressed dissatisfaction with our standard narratives of this period in ecclesiastical history. But new, broad interpretations have not yet emerged. Building on the discussions begun in our 2012 panels, this session includes papers analyzing reform in specific 11th- or 12th-century texts, focusing especially on regular clergy and their visions of reform of secular clergy. Respondents have been asked to consider, What sort of narrative of reform would best accommodate the evidence of this source? - John S. Ott