Session Title

Ruodlieb: New Approaches

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Monika Otter, Elizabeth Archibald

Organizer Affiliation

Dartmouth College, Durham Univ.

Presider Name

Thomas O'Donnell

Presider Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Ruodlieb, Apolonius, and Romance in Latin

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Archibald

Paper Title 2

Iocum Magnum Dare: Game, Humor, and Wisdom in Ruodlieb

Presenter 2 Name

Monika Otter

Paper Title 3

Reading the Animals in Ruodlieb

Presenter 3 Name

Simon Meecham-Jones

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Cambridge/Swansea Univ.

Start Date

12-5-2013 8:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1135

Description

The eleventh-century fragmentary Latin verse narrative known as the Ruodlieb is unknown to most medievalists, but it has much to offer scholars working on medieval fiction both in Latin and the vernacular. It contains a tantalizing mixture of episodes and motifs from numerous genres, epic, fabliau, exempla, lyric, and romance --even though it is in Latin and predates the 'rise of romance' by a century. Apparently composed at the German monastery of Tegernsee, it discusses love and marriage, war and kingship, with sophistication and wit. Partly because of its fragmentary state and uncertain genre, it remains neglected. We attempt to approach the poem from a variety of critical angles and with a variety of critical issues, including genre, gender, animal studies, the role of monastic schools and the trivium in early literature, and the relationship of Latin and the vernaculars.

Monika C. Otter

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May 12th, 8:30 AM

Ruodlieb: New Approaches

Schneider 1135

The eleventh-century fragmentary Latin verse narrative known as the Ruodlieb is unknown to most medievalists, but it has much to offer scholars working on medieval fiction both in Latin and the vernacular. It contains a tantalizing mixture of episodes and motifs from numerous genres, epic, fabliau, exempla, lyric, and romance --even though it is in Latin and predates the 'rise of romance' by a century. Apparently composed at the German monastery of Tegernsee, it discusses love and marriage, war and kingship, with sophistication and wit. Partly because of its fragmentary state and uncertain genre, it remains neglected. We attempt to approach the poem from a variety of critical angles and with a variety of critical issues, including genre, gender, animal studies, the role of monastic schools and the trivium in early literature, and the relationship of Latin and the vernaculars.

Monika C. Otter