Session Title

Words and Deeds in Anglo-Saxon England

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Stephanie Clark, Shannon Godlove

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Oregon, Columbus State Univ.

Presider Name

Shannon Godlove

Paper Title 1

Cwædon þæt he wære god bat-weard

Presenter 1 Name

David Nixon

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Palm Beach State College

Paper Title 2

Measuring Hell by Hand: Echoes of Rogationtide Practices in Christ and Satan

Presenter 2 Name

Jill Fitzgerald

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Start Date

9-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley I 101

Description

The proposed session will investigate the interrelationship of words and deeds in Anglo-Saxon and other early insular cultures and the importance of words and deeds in shaping and transforming the self and community. The orality of these cultures formalizes language in performance as well as writing, transforming abstract language into concrete deeds. In past years, this session has presented papers focusing on such diverse expressions of words and deeds as cognitive theory, gendered performance in the relationship between word and deeds, words and deeds in the ritual context of gift exchange, studies of specific works (Beowulf), and authors (Alfred, Cynewulf). We anticipate that this topic will continue to draw a range of interesting submissions intersecting with the concerns of ritual theory, performance theory, performative language, cognitive theory, and issues of identity and subjectivity, as well as more traditional cultural and literary studies.

Stephanie Clark

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Words and Deeds in Anglo-Saxon England

Valley I 101

The proposed session will investigate the interrelationship of words and deeds in Anglo-Saxon and other early insular cultures and the importance of words and deeds in shaping and transforming the self and community. The orality of these cultures formalizes language in performance as well as writing, transforming abstract language into concrete deeds. In past years, this session has presented papers focusing on such diverse expressions of words and deeds as cognitive theory, gendered performance in the relationship between word and deeds, words and deeds in the ritual context of gift exchange, studies of specific works (Beowulf), and authors (Alfred, Cynewulf). We anticipate that this topic will continue to draw a range of interesting submissions intersecting with the concerns of ritual theory, performance theory, performative language, cognitive theory, and issues of identity and subjectivity, as well as more traditional cultural and literary studies.

Stephanie Clark