Session Title

The Material Culture of Magic

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence; Societas Magica

Organizer Name

László Sándor Chardonnens

Organizer Affiliation

Radboud Univ. Nijmegen

Presider Name

David Porreca

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Waterloo

Paper Title 1

Arma Christi Roll or Textual Amulet?: The Manuscript Evidence

Presenter 1 Name

Mary Agnes Edsall

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Institute for Research in the Humanities, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison

Paper Title 2

Down to Earth: The Archaeology of Medieval Magic

Presenter 2 Name

Mirko Gutjahr

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Landesmuseum für Vorgeschichte

Paper Title 3

Inscribed in Lead and Concealed in Stone: The History of a Hitherto Unknown Late Medieval Sigillum Dei

Presenter 3 Name

László Sándor Chardonnens

Start Date

12-5-2013 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

The description and conceptual visualisation of magical artefacts is well-known from medieval written sources, which sometimes dwell on procedures to make and use magical objects at length. Depending on their nature, magical artefacts themselves survive in varying numbers. Protective amulets and verbal charms made, for instance, from parchment, wax, or lead, survive in conspicuously larger numbers than objects of theurgic magic, such as the Sigillum Dei, even though the production of both groups of objects is described in detail in medieval manuals of magic. This session, co-sponsored by the Societas Magica and the Research Group on Manuscript Evidence, focuses on the information which magical artefacts provide about magical practices, in addition to what the written sources tell about the construction and use of these artefacts.

Mildred Budny

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 12th, 10:30 AM

The Material Culture of Magic

Bernhard 213

The description and conceptual visualisation of magical artefacts is well-known from medieval written sources, which sometimes dwell on procedures to make and use magical objects at length. Depending on their nature, magical artefacts themselves survive in varying numbers. Protective amulets and verbal charms made, for instance, from parchment, wax, or lead, survive in conspicuously larger numbers than objects of theurgic magic, such as the Sigillum Dei, even though the production of both groups of objects is described in detail in medieval manuals of magic. This session, co-sponsored by the Societas Magica and the Research Group on Manuscript Evidence, focuses on the information which magical artefacts provide about magical practices, in addition to what the written sources tell about the construction and use of these artefacts.

Mildred Budny