Session Title

Thriving (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studies

Organizer Name

Eileen A. Joy

Organizer Affiliation

BABEL Working Group

Presider Name

Eileen A. Joy

Paper Title 1

Living and Thriving

Presenter 1 Name

Patricia Clare Ingham

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 2

Come Flourish with Me: Critically Mixing Pleasure and Politics

Presenter 2 Name

Randy P. Schiff

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. at Buffalo

Paper Title 3

Provisionality and Provision

Presenter 3 Name

Julie Orlemanski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston College

Paper Title 4

"From His Mouth Delyverly": Thriving in the Nun's Priest's Tale

Presenter 4 Name

Kathy Lavezzo

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Iowa

Paper Title 5

Sacrificial Thriving

Presenter 5 Name

Paul Megna

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Paper Title 6

living/riddle

Presenter 6 Name

Daniel C. Remein

Presenter 6 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Paper Title 7

Staying Alive/Radiance

Presenter 7 Name

L. O. Aranye Fradenburg, Michael Snediker

Presenter 7 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara, Queen's Univ. Kingston

Start Date

9-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

The work of Aranye Fradenburg, especially her psychoanalytic criticism of Chaucer, and her formulations of discontinuist historical approaches to the Middle Ages, has been extremely influential within medieval studies for the past 15 or so years. More recently she has been focusing on more broad defenses of the humanities, especially with regard to the valuable role of literary studies relative to the arts of everyday living, eudaimonia [flourishing], ethical community, and well-being, and also on psychoanalysis itself as a "liberal art." Relationality, intersubjectivity, aliveness, resilience, care of the self and also of others, adaptive flexibility, playfulness, shared attention, companionship, healing, and thriving seem, increasingly, to be the key watchwords and concerns of Fradenburg's work, and at the same time, the so-called "literary" mode is still central to these concerns, such that, as Fradenburg has written, "Interpretation and relationality depend on one another because all relationships are unending processes of interpretation and expression, listening and signifying. In turn, sentience assists relationality: we can’t thrive and probably can’t survive without minds open to possibility, capable of sensing and interpreting the tiniest shifts in, e.g., pitch and tone" ["Frontline: The Liberal Arts of Psychoanalysis," Journal of theAmerican Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry 39.4 (2011): 589-609]. This roundtable invites short presentations on the valuable role(s) that medieval studies might play in the future of the liberal arts, especially as they pertain to "thriving" and "living" and to the ways in which living itself is an art.

Eileen A. Joy

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Thriving (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1005

The work of Aranye Fradenburg, especially her psychoanalytic criticism of Chaucer, and her formulations of discontinuist historical approaches to the Middle Ages, has been extremely influential within medieval studies for the past 15 or so years. More recently she has been focusing on more broad defenses of the humanities, especially with regard to the valuable role of literary studies relative to the arts of everyday living, eudaimonia [flourishing], ethical community, and well-being, and also on psychoanalysis itself as a "liberal art." Relationality, intersubjectivity, aliveness, resilience, care of the self and also of others, adaptive flexibility, playfulness, shared attention, companionship, healing, and thriving seem, increasingly, to be the key watchwords and concerns of Fradenburg's work, and at the same time, the so-called "literary" mode is still central to these concerns, such that, as Fradenburg has written, "Interpretation and relationality depend on one another because all relationships are unending processes of interpretation and expression, listening and signifying. In turn, sentience assists relationality: we can’t thrive and probably can’t survive without minds open to possibility, capable of sensing and interpreting the tiniest shifts in, e.g., pitch and tone" ["Frontline: The Liberal Arts of Psychoanalysis," Journal of theAmerican Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry 39.4 (2011): 589-609]. This roundtable invites short presentations on the valuable role(s) that medieval studies might play in the future of the liberal arts, especially as they pertain to "thriving" and "living" and to the ways in which living itself is an art.

Eileen A. Joy