Session Title

Between Jerusalem and Europe: Shaping and Reshaping Sacred Sites

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Spectrum: Visual Translation of Jerusalem, The Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem

Organizer Name

Renana Bartal

Organizer Affiliation

Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Presider Name

Renana Bartal

Paper Title 1

Rome, the New Jerusalem

Presenter 1 Name

Nancy Ross

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Dixie State College of Utah

Paper Title 2

Medieval Modes of Transference: Diverse Strategies of Transporting Jerusalem to Pisa

Presenter 2 Name

Neta Bar-Yoseph Bodner

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Hebrew Univ.

Paper Title 3

The Tomb Aedicule of Narbonne: A Visual Representation of the Holy Land in Southern Gaul

Presenter 3 Name

Shimrit Shriki

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem

Start Date

9-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1330

Description

Jerusalem’s buildings, most notably the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, and its sacred routes, such as the Stations of the Cross, were often recreated in Europe as architectural copies, complexes and devotional sites. The city’s sacred locations were not only transferred to Europe, they were also constantly being reshaped by the literary, liturgical or visual traditions of European visitors. The papers in this session will explore this reciprocal influence. They will offer new perspectives on the strategies of transferring sacred locations and devotional routes from Jerusalem to Europe, as well as the way Jerusalem sites and their perception were shaped by European expectations. Speakers will consider the recreation of devotional sites and routes through visual representation and devotional practice, as well as the influence of historiographical traditions on the reconstruction of Jerusalem’s monuments.

Renana Bartal

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Between Jerusalem and Europe: Shaping and Reshaping Sacred Sites

Schneider 1330

Jerusalem’s buildings, most notably the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, and its sacred routes, such as the Stations of the Cross, were often recreated in Europe as architectural copies, complexes and devotional sites. The city’s sacred locations were not only transferred to Europe, they were also constantly being reshaped by the literary, liturgical or visual traditions of European visitors. The papers in this session will explore this reciprocal influence. They will offer new perspectives on the strategies of transferring sacred locations and devotional routes from Jerusalem to Europe, as well as the way Jerusalem sites and their perception were shaped by European expectations. Speakers will consider the recreation of devotional sites and routes through visual representation and devotional practice, as well as the influence of historiographical traditions on the reconstruction of Jerusalem’s monuments.

Renana Bartal