Session Title

Ecclesiastical Inventions and Interventions: Exploring the Legacy of Antiquarian Scholarship, Early Conservation and Restoration Practice in Church Buildings, and Concepts of Authenticity from the Medieval Period Onwards

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Organizer Name

Dee Dyas

Organizer Affiliation

Centre for the Study of Christianity and Culture, Univ. of York

Presider Name

Rachel M. Koopmans

Presider Affiliation

York Univ.

Paper Title 1

"As It Presents Itself to My Eye": Antiquarian Understanding and Interpretation of the Origin and Meaning of Medieval Imagery in York Minster

Presenter 1 Name

Louise Hampson

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Paper Title 2

Antiquarian Attitudes and the Recording of Wall Paintings in Parish Churches in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century England

Presenter 2 Name

Kate Giles

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Start Date

9-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1335

Description

This session explores the legacy of the relationship between different interpretations of the past and concepts of authenticity for Medieval Studies today. Traditionally, the term 'Antiquarian' has been used rather pejoratively by historians and archaeologists to describe those obsessed with meticulous recording and description of antiquities but less concerned with analysis and interpretation. However Antiquarians themselves have recently formed the focus of major exhibitions and scholarly volumes. Such recent studies shed important light on ways in which disciplines and methodologies were framed by - and continue to draw upon - Antiquarian traditions. Likewise authors and chroniclers in the medieval period collated and sometimes invented historical documentation, making attributions now often labelled 'forgeries', but which were often the product of a genuine desire to 'put right' the omissions or losses of the past . Such products and their subsequent use and interpretation can tell us much about the cultural and societal pressures and nuances of their times.

Dee Dyas

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Ecclesiastical Inventions and Interventions: Exploring the Legacy of Antiquarian Scholarship, Early Conservation and Restoration Practice in Church Buildings, and Concepts of Authenticity from the Medieval Period Onwards

Schneider 1335

This session explores the legacy of the relationship between different interpretations of the past and concepts of authenticity for Medieval Studies today. Traditionally, the term 'Antiquarian' has been used rather pejoratively by historians and archaeologists to describe those obsessed with meticulous recording and description of antiquities but less concerned with analysis and interpretation. However Antiquarians themselves have recently formed the focus of major exhibitions and scholarly volumes. Such recent studies shed important light on ways in which disciplines and methodologies were framed by - and continue to draw upon - Antiquarian traditions. Likewise authors and chroniclers in the medieval period collated and sometimes invented historical documentation, making attributions now often labelled 'forgeries', but which were often the product of a genuine desire to 'put right' the omissions or losses of the past . Such products and their subsequent use and interpretation can tell us much about the cultural and societal pressures and nuances of their times.

Dee Dyas