Session Title

Communal Contexts for Monastic Thought

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Catholic Studies, Durham Univ.

Organizer Name

Jay Diehl, Lauren Mancia

Organizer Affiliation

Long Island Univ.-C. W. Post Campus, Yale Univ.

Presider Name

Jay Diehl

Paper Title 1

Concerning Concordance: Anselm of Canterbury's Last Communities

Presenter 1 Name

Giles E. M. Gasper

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Durham Univ.

Paper Title 2

John at Fécamp

Presenter 2 Name

Lauren Mancia

Paper Title 3

Cluniac Writers and Literary Reputation during the Abbacy of Peter the Venerable

Presenter 3 Name

Marc Saurette

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Carleton Univ.

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Alex J. Novikoff

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Rhodes College

Start Date

9-5-2013 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

Monastic texts from the Central Middle Ages and the body of though they constitute have been examined through many lenses by scholars: as individual instances of an emergent and eventually coherent monastic theology; in the light of their sources and as part of broader trajectories in devotional thought; and as key features of a larger revival of learning intellectual culture. However, one of the most immediate and vital contexts for understanding these sources remains underappreciated: that of the monastic scholars' own communities. While monastic writers often situated their works in longstanding and accepted genres of exegetical, homiletic, and liturgical writings, their writings were nonetheless crafted in response to immediate concerns of the spiritual or intellectual culture of the cloister they inhabited. This sessions will examine the various ways in which the writings of important monastic scholars of the central Middle Ages were shaped by and intended for the communities in which they were produced. Papers will explore the ways in which the liturgical, educational, political, and social concerns particular to specific monastic centers affected aspects of monastic texts that have often been attributed to broader trends in monastic culture and spirituality.

Jay Diehl

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Communal Contexts for Monastic Thought

Schneider 1360

Monastic texts from the Central Middle Ages and the body of though they constitute have been examined through many lenses by scholars: as individual instances of an emergent and eventually coherent monastic theology; in the light of their sources and as part of broader trajectories in devotional thought; and as key features of a larger revival of learning intellectual culture. However, one of the most immediate and vital contexts for understanding these sources remains underappreciated: that of the monastic scholars' own communities. While monastic writers often situated their works in longstanding and accepted genres of exegetical, homiletic, and liturgical writings, their writings were nonetheless crafted in response to immediate concerns of the spiritual or intellectual culture of the cloister they inhabited. This sessions will examine the various ways in which the writings of important monastic scholars of the central Middle Ages were shaped by and intended for the communities in which they were produced. Papers will explore the ways in which the liturgical, educational, political, and social concerns particular to specific monastic centers affected aspects of monastic texts that have often been attributed to broader trends in monastic culture and spirituality.

Jay Diehl