Session Title

The Exegetical Turn: Exegesis as a Paradigm for New Understandings of the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Virginia Tech

Organizer Name

Matthew Gabriele

Organizer Affiliation

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ.

Presider Name

David M. Perry

Presider Affiliation

Dominican Univ.

Paper Title 1

Kissing Christ: Judas’s Mouth as Biblical Exegesis

Presenter 1 Name

Rabia Gregory

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 2

The Exegetical Diplomas of King Philip I of Francia (1060-1108)

Presenter 2 Name

Matthew Gabriele

Paper Title 3

Read! Think! Engage! How Luther’s Exegesis of Genesis Exhorted People out of the Cloister and into Family and Society

Presenter 3 Name

Jennifer Hockenbery

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Mount Mary Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1320

Description

Biblical verses were never “naked” in the Middle Ages. They were clothed in the heavy garments of tradition and weighed down with the burden of commentary. We have the tendency to see an eleventh-century monastic chronicler cite Jeremiah and think “Jeremiah,” when we should be thinking, with author and intended reader, “Hrabanus,” “Haimo,” “Paschasius,” and “Jerome.” We tend to forget that men of the Middle Ages often encountered the Bible through Carolingian and Patristic commentaries.

This session will therefore seek to see what precisely we may have missed, to reconsider historical, literary, and/ or artistic artifacts from the Middle Ages in light of the exegetical tradition in which they were created. Then, in turn, this session will allow us to ask if this new understanding of how these objects were created and received fundamentally change how we understand the European Middle Ages itself.

Matthew Gabriele

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

The Exegetical Turn: Exegesis as a Paradigm for New Understandings of the Middle Ages

Schneider 1320

Biblical verses were never “naked” in the Middle Ages. They were clothed in the heavy garments of tradition and weighed down with the burden of commentary. We have the tendency to see an eleventh-century monastic chronicler cite Jeremiah and think “Jeremiah,” when we should be thinking, with author and intended reader, “Hrabanus,” “Haimo,” “Paschasius,” and “Jerome.” We tend to forget that men of the Middle Ages often encountered the Bible through Carolingian and Patristic commentaries.

This session will therefore seek to see what precisely we may have missed, to reconsider historical, literary, and/ or artistic artifacts from the Middle Ages in light of the exegetical tradition in which they were created. Then, in turn, this session will allow us to ask if this new understanding of how these objects were created and received fundamentally change how we understand the European Middle Ages itself.

Matthew Gabriele