Session Title

Monsters I: Parallel Worlds

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application (MEARCSTAPA)

Organizer Name

Asa Simon Mittman, Stefanie Goyette

Organizer Affiliation

California State Univ.-Chico, Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Harvard Univ.

Presider Name

Stefanie Goyette

Paper Title 1

Monstrous Ireland and the Fantasy of British Sovereignty

Presenter 1 Name

Alexander Baldassano

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Graduate Center, CUNY

Paper Title 2

Lady Macbeth and the Strix: Monstrous Maternity, Time, and Periodization

Presenter 2 Name

Morgan Bozick

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Pennsylvania State Univ.

Paper Title 3

(Not) Solving the Mystery: The Complexity of the Melusine Legendary in Medieval French and German Traditions

Presenter 3 Name

Deva Fall Kemmis, Melissa Ridley Elmes

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Georgetown Univ., Univ. of North Carolina-Greensboro

Start Date

8-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1360

Description

Refraction, reflection, intrusion, illusion, overlay, visitation, wandering, straying: parallel worlds double and haunt medieval landscapes, providing voyage destinations and otherworldly visitors. Medieval worlds are not unitary or univocal, as refugees seek Torelore and the Pays de Cocagne; as chroniclers record or imagine far-off Carthage and Jerusalem; as the secular world finds itself invaded by hellish demons or heavenly angels; as saints and mystics simultaneously inhabit this world and the next. What can other worlds, or other temporalities, tell us about how medieval cultures understood the quotidian or secular world? How does the ingress of or egress to various worlds beyond establish or erode the definition of the here-and-now? Are all such intrusions monstrous? Does monstrosity necessitate intrusion from beyond? We invite papers from all disciplines and national traditions, on topics that might include the double presence of life and death, profane and sacred, self and other, animal and human, native and foreigner, male and female, straight and queer, past, future, and present.

Asa S. Mittman

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Monsters I: Parallel Worlds

Schneider 1360

Refraction, reflection, intrusion, illusion, overlay, visitation, wandering, straying: parallel worlds double and haunt medieval landscapes, providing voyage destinations and otherworldly visitors. Medieval worlds are not unitary or univocal, as refugees seek Torelore and the Pays de Cocagne; as chroniclers record or imagine far-off Carthage and Jerusalem; as the secular world finds itself invaded by hellish demons or heavenly angels; as saints and mystics simultaneously inhabit this world and the next. What can other worlds, or other temporalities, tell us about how medieval cultures understood the quotidian or secular world? How does the ingress of or egress to various worlds beyond establish or erode the definition of the here-and-now? Are all such intrusions monstrous? Does monstrosity necessitate intrusion from beyond? We invite papers from all disciplines and national traditions, on topics that might include the double presence of life and death, profane and sacred, self and other, animal and human, native and foreigner, male and female, straight and queer, past, future, and present.

Asa S. Mittman