Session Title

Comparative Approaches to the Visual Arts of Iberia and Italy: Sites of Exchange and Affinity in the Western Mediterranean

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Julia Perratore

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Presider Name

Julia Perratore

Paper Title 1

Aragonese Naples and the Heritage of Roman Antiquity: The Porta Maggiore of Castelnuovo as Triumphal Arch

Presenter 1 Name

Jesus Rodriguez Viejo

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. de Paris IV–Sorbonne

Paper Title 2

What Do Aribert, Archbishop of Milan, and Fernando I, King of León, Have in Common?

Presenter 2 Name

Janet Kempf

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Humboldt-Univ. Berlin

Paper Title 3

A Moving Target?: Labor and Church Building in Twelfth-Century South Italy

Presenter 3 Name

Joseph Williams

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Duke Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

Regional approaches to art history have long separated Italy and Iberia, though a number of direct links and uncanny parallels generated strong affinities between the two peninsulas and their outlying islands during the Middle Ages. Medieval Italy and Iberia’s many contextual similarities resulted in large part from their direct access to the Mediterranean, as can be seen in their accommodation of diverse cultures, their histories of multiconfessional domination, and their participation in maritime trade. At the same time, historical grounding in the Latin Christian tradition set them apart from neighboring lands around the sea. Together these factors indicate that Italy and Iberia merit greater efforts of joint study, and this session aims to investigate the possibilities of a comparative approach.

Organized by Julia Perratore

Julia Perratore

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Comparative Approaches to the Visual Arts of Iberia and Italy: Sites of Exchange and Affinity in the Western Mediterranean

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Regional approaches to art history have long separated Italy and Iberia, though a number of direct links and uncanny parallels generated strong affinities between the two peninsulas and their outlying islands during the Middle Ages. Medieval Italy and Iberia’s many contextual similarities resulted in large part from their direct access to the Mediterranean, as can be seen in their accommodation of diverse cultures, their histories of multiconfessional domination, and their participation in maritime trade. At the same time, historical grounding in the Latin Christian tradition set them apart from neighboring lands around the sea. Together these factors indicate that Italy and Iberia merit greater efforts of joint study, and this session aims to investigate the possibilities of a comparative approach.

Organized by Julia Perratore

Julia Perratore