Session Title

Commerce, Conflict, and Cultural Interaction in the Late Medieval Mediterranean

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of History, Western Michigan Univ.

Organizer Name

David D. Terry

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Larry J. Simon

Presider Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 1

Ethnic Self-Identification and the Liberation of Slaves in Fourteenth-Century Palermo

Presenter 1 Name

Jack Goodman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Paper Title 2

The Confraternity of Orsanmichele: A Holy Wall of Protection for the Fourteenth-Century Florentine Grain Market

Presenter 2 Name

Marie D'Aguanno Ito

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Catholic Univ. of America

Paper Title 3

Piracy and Commerce under James II of Aragon, 1291-1327

Presenter 3 Name

David D. Terry

Paper Title 4

Chasing a Phantasticus: Ramon Llull's Crusade Treatises in the Context of the Late Medieval Mediterranean World

Presenter 4 Name

Michael J. Sanders

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2014 7:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

This session will highlight recent exploitations of the rich Medieval archival holdings of the Mediterranean basin and seek to open a discourse on the intersection of war and commerce with identity and politics. The four papers examine the role of identity among slave populations in Late Medieval Sicily, the relationship between merchant groups and local government in 13th and 14th century Florence, the relationship between piracy, authority, and commerce in the western Mediterranean during the time of King James II of Aragon, and Ramon Llull's crusading ideology in the early 14th century.

David D. Terry

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May 8th, 7:30 PM

Commerce, Conflict, and Cultural Interaction in the Late Medieval Mediterranean

Bernhard 211

This session will highlight recent exploitations of the rich Medieval archival holdings of the Mediterranean basin and seek to open a discourse on the intersection of war and commerce with identity and politics. The four papers examine the role of identity among slave populations in Late Medieval Sicily, the relationship between merchant groups and local government in 13th and 14th century Florence, the relationship between piracy, authority, and commerce in the western Mediterranean during the time of King James II of Aragon, and Ramon Llull's crusading ideology in the early 14th century.

David D. Terry