Session Title

From Charisma to Curriculum? Communities of Learning in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Program in Medieval Studies, Cornell Univ.

Organizer Name

Corinna Matlis, Philippa Byrne

Organizer Affiliation

Cornell Univ., Univ. of Oxford

Presider Name

Philippa Byrne

Paper Title 1

Textual Relationships between the Scholastic Psalms Commentaries of the Early Twelfth Century

Presenter 1 Name

Annika Ekman

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Toronto

Paper Title 2

Clear Answers and Clerical Nuns: Gender and Intellectual Culture in the Twelfth Century

Presenter 2 Name

Sarah M. Spalding

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Catholic Univ. of America

Paper Title 3

Ralph of Coggeshall and Peter the Chanter

Presenter 3 Name

Hugh Reid

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Oxford

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

C. Stephen Jaeger

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Illinois-Urbana-Champaign

Start Date

9-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

This session aims to provoke discussion about the continuing problem of categorising intellectual thought in Europe in the period 1000-1200. For instance, what usefulness is there in thinking about periodisation in terms of ‘monastic’ versus ‘scholastic’ cultures? And is it possible to provide a single, over-arching narrative of intellectual change which encompasses the changes of the period, or should historical research focus on the particular developments of distinctive intellectual communities? The papers in this session will both deal with specific writers and with broad questions of intellectual classification.

Corinna M. Matlis

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

From Charisma to Curriculum? Communities of Learning in the Eleventh and Twelfth Centuries

Valley III Stinson Lounge

This session aims to provoke discussion about the continuing problem of categorising intellectual thought in Europe in the period 1000-1200. For instance, what usefulness is there in thinking about periodisation in terms of ‘monastic’ versus ‘scholastic’ cultures? And is it possible to provide a single, over-arching narrative of intellectual change which encompasses the changes of the period, or should historical research focus on the particular developments of distinctive intellectual communities? The papers in this session will both deal with specific writers and with broad questions of intellectual classification.

Corinna M. Matlis