Session Title

Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Ibero-Medieval Association of North America (IMANA); North American Catalan Society

Organizer Name

Laura Delbrugge, John A. Bollweg

Organizer Affiliation

Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania, Western Michigan Univ./College of DuPage

Presider Name

Laura Delbrugge

Paper Title 1

"Las obras hazen linaje; que, al fin, todos somos hijos de Adán y Eva": Self-Hood on the Margins in Celestina

Presenter 1 Name

Rachel Scott

Presenter 1 Affiliation

King's College London

Paper Title 2

Keeping up Appearances with "Juste Ypocrisie": Anne de Beaujeu's Machiavellian "Lessons" for Her Daughter

Presenter 2 Name

Zita Eva Rohr

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Sidney

Paper Title 3

Looking in the Mirror: Catalina, João III of Portugal, and a Speculum for a Queen-to-Be

Presenter 3 Name

Nuria Silleras-Fernandez

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Colorado-Boulder

Paper Title 4

The Dual Disguises of a Runaway Slave: Joseph Soller, “Mulatto Pilgrim” and Priest Impersonator

Presenter 4 Name

John K. Moore

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Alabama-Birmingham

Start Date

9-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

In the Middle Ages individuals and groups could define or express identity through a variety of literary and performative practices: the creation of authorial personae, the exercise of patronage, the composition or use of courtesy manuals, the invention (or recovery) of family and community history, editorial practice, passing, professional formation, autobiography, social climbing and mobility, etc. In these and other exercises in the creation and expression of identity, authors and historical actors employ inherited attributes, acquired skills and performed actions to persuade contemporaries (or to dissemble) in ways that illustrate the values and expectations prevalent in their historical context. For this panel, IMANA and NACS sought papers that discuss historical and literary examples (including examples of literary characters) of the definition and expression of identity in cooperation or conflict with the values and expectations of the culture of Iberia and the Mediterranean World in the later middle ages (1200 - 1500 CE).

John A. Bollweg

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Self-Fashioning and Assumptions of Identity in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia

Fetzer 1005

In the Middle Ages individuals and groups could define or express identity through a variety of literary and performative practices: the creation of authorial personae, the exercise of patronage, the composition or use of courtesy manuals, the invention (or recovery) of family and community history, editorial practice, passing, professional formation, autobiography, social climbing and mobility, etc. In these and other exercises in the creation and expression of identity, authors and historical actors employ inherited attributes, acquired skills and performed actions to persuade contemporaries (or to dissemble) in ways that illustrate the values and expectations prevalent in their historical context. For this panel, IMANA and NACS sought papers that discuss historical and literary examples (including examples of literary characters) of the definition and expression of identity in cooperation or conflict with the values and expectations of the culture of Iberia and the Mediterranean World in the later middle ages (1200 - 1500 CE).

John A. Bollweg