Session Title

New Innovations in Early Medieval Archaeology: Material Culture before 1000

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Danielle Trynoski

Organizer Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Presider Name

Guy Halsall

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of York

Paper Title 1

Viking Winter Camps: Creating a Model Using Geospatial Statistical Analysis

Presenter 1 Name

Danielle Trynoski, Matthew Ziebarth

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Independent Scholar, Independent Scholar

Paper Title 2

Coin Hoards and Portable Wealth from Harkirke to Silverdale: Viking Settlers and Colonization in Northwestern England, ca. 900-1050

Presenter 2 Name

Russ Goodrich

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Moberly Area Community College

Start Date

8-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

New programs to record the existence of archaeological material and new methods of analysis deserve serious discussion. This session will welcome papers discussing social, economic, or political conclusions drawn from material culture and the archaeological record of the early medieval period (400-1000). Papers incorporating recent innovations such as new recording schemes or recently adopted technologies will be given preference.

Some of these programs such as the United Kingdom's Portable Antiquities Scheme are well-established but still reach for improvement especially while struggling to adapt to difficult economic pressures. Additionally, ample opportunities exist to draw exciting conclusions from the wide range of this record. Techniques recently adapted to analysis of archaeological material are also being hotly debated as any new method should be. Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (hhXRF) is one example of previously used technology adjusted to be less destructive and easily portable. This is opening the doors to collections which were previously safeguarded from more destructive technology to date and analyse the composition of objects. Shugar and Mass (2013) debate the use of this technology even as it is beginning to be widely applied in numerous research projects. Another example of a technology which is constantly supporting new research or the revision of prior research is Geographic Information Systems, commonly known as GIS. The relationship between GIS programs and archaeological research continues to develop as more data is configured to be accessible to computer analysis even in field excavation situations. Other technological methods of analyzing archaeological material, such as isotope analysis, DNA studies, and AutoCAD are also constantly finding new applications. The use of these technologies and others will be welcomed in this discussion of early medieval archaeology.

Danielle L. Trynoski

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 10:00 AM

New Innovations in Early Medieval Archaeology: Material Culture before 1000

Fetzer 2020

New programs to record the existence of archaeological material and new methods of analysis deserve serious discussion. This session will welcome papers discussing social, economic, or political conclusions drawn from material culture and the archaeological record of the early medieval period (400-1000). Papers incorporating recent innovations such as new recording schemes or recently adopted technologies will be given preference.

Some of these programs such as the United Kingdom's Portable Antiquities Scheme are well-established but still reach for improvement especially while struggling to adapt to difficult economic pressures. Additionally, ample opportunities exist to draw exciting conclusions from the wide range of this record. Techniques recently adapted to analysis of archaeological material are also being hotly debated as any new method should be. Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence (hhXRF) is one example of previously used technology adjusted to be less destructive and easily portable. This is opening the doors to collections which were previously safeguarded from more destructive technology to date and analyse the composition of objects. Shugar and Mass (2013) debate the use of this technology even as it is beginning to be widely applied in numerous research projects. Another example of a technology which is constantly supporting new research or the revision of prior research is Geographic Information Systems, commonly known as GIS. The relationship between GIS programs and archaeological research continues to develop as more data is configured to be accessible to computer analysis even in field excavation situations. Other technological methods of analyzing archaeological material, such as isotope analysis, DNA studies, and AutoCAD are also constantly finding new applications. The use of these technologies and others will be welcomed in this discussion of early medieval archaeology.

Danielle L. Trynoski