Session Title

Individual Style or House Style? Assessing Scribal Contributions, Artistic Production, and Creative Achievements

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence

Organizer Name

Mildred Budny

Organizer Affiliation

Research Group on Manuscript Evidence

Presider Name

Celia Chazelle

Presider Affiliation

College of New Jersey

Paper Title 1

Half-Uncial a and Uncial a at Line-Ends: The Division of Hands in the Book of Kells and an Insight into the "Calligraphic Imagination" Evident in the Script

Presenter 1 Name

Donncha MacGabhann

Presenter 1 Affiliation

School of Advanced Study, Univ. of London

Paper Title 2

Variability or Multiple Identities? A Question of Style, Constraints, and Potential

Presenter 2 Name

Mildred Budny

Paper Title 3

Response: Polygraphism

Presenter 3 Name

David Ganz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Medieval Institute, Univ. of Notre Dame/Darwin College, Univ. of Cambridge

Start Date

9-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1155

Description

Our session explores the complex issues of recognizing, and distinguishing between, "Individual Style" or "House Style" in the hands of scribes, artists, and others creating distinctive works of whatever kind. Contributions and comments in our recent sessions at the Congress and other settings make it clear that these issues of attribution impact numerous areas of study -- Insular manuscripts, Middle English palaeography, to name a few -- while a suitably rigorous methodology deserves wider application.

Mildred Budny

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Individual Style or House Style? Assessing Scribal Contributions, Artistic Production, and Creative Achievements

Schneider 1155

Our session explores the complex issues of recognizing, and distinguishing between, "Individual Style" or "House Style" in the hands of scribes, artists, and others creating distinctive works of whatever kind. Contributions and comments in our recent sessions at the Congress and other settings make it clear that these issues of attribution impact numerous areas of study -- Insular manuscripts, Middle English palaeography, to name a few -- while a suitably rigorous methodology deserves wider application.

Mildred Budny