Session Title

Animal, Vegetable, and Mineral: Textual and Material Evidence of Medieval Healing

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

Linda Migl Keyser

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Maryland

Presider Name

Linda Migl Keyser

Paper Title 1

Mint, Mandrake, and Materia Medica: Localized Andalusi Medical Knowledge in Practice

Presenter 1 Name

Allyssa J. Metzger

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 2

Sixteenth-Century Italian Medical Recipe Books: Between the Ideal and the Practical

Presenter 2 Name

Emily E. Hagens

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

Madness as Metaphor: Clinical Concepts in Medieval Psychiatry

Presenter 3 Name

Mary Hardiman Farley

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 4

Diseases Shared by Humans and Animals

Presenter 4 Name

William H. York

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Portland State Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 204

Description

Recent research has opened new doors into understanding the influence of medical theorists on the day-to-day practice or medieval healers. From increasing availability of primary texts to osteoarcheological and biomolecular investigations, scholars have expanded the knowledge base for interdisciplinary inquiries into the actual and the perceived practices of medieval healers in day-to-day common individual illness as well as expansive epidemiological concerns, such as leprosy and plague.

Gerard P. NeCastro

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Animal, Vegetable, and Mineral: Textual and Material Evidence of Medieval Healing

Bernhard 204

Recent research has opened new doors into understanding the influence of medical theorists on the day-to-day practice or medieval healers. From increasing availability of primary texts to osteoarcheological and biomolecular investigations, scholars have expanded the knowledge base for interdisciplinary inquiries into the actual and the perceived practices of medieval healers in day-to-day common individual illness as well as expansive epidemiological concerns, such as leprosy and plague.

Gerard P. NeCastro