Session Title

Faking It (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Material Collective

Organizer Name

Maggie M. Williams

Organizer Affiliation

William Paterson Univ./Material Collective

Presider Name

Nancy M. Thompson

Presider Affiliation

St. Olaf College/Material Collective

Paper Title 1

Simulation and Sexuality: Medieval "Courtly Love" Ivories and Their Nineteenth-Century Forgeries

Presenter 1 Name

Martha Easton

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Seton Hall Univ.

Paper Title 2

Lying outside the Lines: Alexandre Lenoir's Installations of Medieval Art

Presenter 2 Name

Mary B. Shepard

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Arkansas-Fort Smith

Paper Title 3

Creative Spirit and the Glenmorangie Research Project at National Museums Scotland

Presenter 3 Name

Martin Goldberg, Mhairi Maxwell

Presenter 3 Affiliation

National Museums Scotland, National Museums Scotland

Paper Title 4

"Affection makes -h-i-m- her false, -h-e- she speaks not true": Embracing Fiction's Fakery

Presenter 4 Name

Lois Leveen

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 5

Parchmenteresy: What Does a Recreated Medieval Material Tell Us? The Work of Jesse Meyer at Pergamena

Presenter 5 Name

Maggie M. Williams

Start Date

9-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

It sometimes feels as though medievalists are adrift in a sea of phoniness. Our objects of study–ivories, sculpture, stained-glass windows, texts–often turn out to be lies and forgeries, in part if not in whole. Moreover, each of us has at some time fallen prey to the “impostor syndrome,” the anxiety that we are frauds undeserving of our success, which we dismiss as luck, timing, and unwarranted praise from our peers. In this session, scholars from a variety of disciplines to explore issues of faking, forgery, and deceit in their objects of study as well as in their practice.

The short papers will consider, among other things: medieval forgeries; the ways that medieval objects deceive modern scholars; the fine line between medievalisms and forgery; the appropriation of medieval objects in new contexts; stumbling blocks on the scholarly path to find the authentic object; and our own perceptions of “faking it” as scholars and teachers.

We welcome medievalist approaches from outside the traditional scholarly realm. Experimental archaeologists, re-enactors, artists, authors, alt-academics, and independent scholars of all sorts might examine fakes, forgeries and the ways in which they produce knowledge about the Middle Ages.

Nancy M. Thompson

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May 9th, 10:00 AM

Faking It (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 210

It sometimes feels as though medievalists are adrift in a sea of phoniness. Our objects of study–ivories, sculpture, stained-glass windows, texts–often turn out to be lies and forgeries, in part if not in whole. Moreover, each of us has at some time fallen prey to the “impostor syndrome,” the anxiety that we are frauds undeserving of our success, which we dismiss as luck, timing, and unwarranted praise from our peers. In this session, scholars from a variety of disciplines to explore issues of faking, forgery, and deceit in their objects of study as well as in their practice.

The short papers will consider, among other things: medieval forgeries; the ways that medieval objects deceive modern scholars; the fine line between medievalisms and forgery; the appropriation of medieval objects in new contexts; stumbling blocks on the scholarly path to find the authentic object; and our own perceptions of “faking it” as scholars and teachers.

We welcome medievalist approaches from outside the traditional scholarly realm. Experimental archaeologists, re-enactors, artists, authors, alt-academics, and independent scholars of all sorts might examine fakes, forgeries and the ways in which they produce knowledge about the Middle Ages.

Nancy M. Thompson