Session Title

Theologies of Consumption: Eucharistic Thought and Food Practices in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Christiana Purdy Moudarres, Salvatore Musumeci

Organizer Affiliation

Yale Univ., Bryan College

Presider Name

Christiana Purdy Moudarres

Paper Title 1

The Silent Revolution of the Eucharistic Experience

Presenter 1 Name

Florin Berindeanu

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Case Western Reserve Univ.

Paper Title 2

Fasting and Eucharistic Desire in the Old French Ovidian Lais and the Lais of Marie de France

Presenter 2 Name

Stefanie Goyette

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Harvard Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson 303

Description

With its reform and regulation of the liturgy, the Carolingian Renaissance heralded an unprecedented fascination with the archetypal Christian feast, the Eucharist. From the first full-length treatise on the subject by Paschasius in 831, De corpore et sanguine domini, to the festival in its honor proposed by Juliana of Liège four centuries later, the Feast of Corpus Christi, the consumption of Christ’s body and blood lay at the forefront of theological debate and popular devotion throughout the later Middle Ages. As theologians assessed the nature of Christ’s presence in the host through forays into natural philosophy and metaphysics, believers professed its power through bouts of ecstasy and preparatory fasts. Welcoming a range of disciplines and media, this panel will examine the development of Eucharistic thought vis-à-vis medieval rituals of consumption, both sacred and profane.

Christiana T. Purdy Moudarres

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Theologies of Consumption: Eucharistic Thought and Food Practices in the Middle Ages

Valley III Stinson 303

With its reform and regulation of the liturgy, the Carolingian Renaissance heralded an unprecedented fascination with the archetypal Christian feast, the Eucharist. From the first full-length treatise on the subject by Paschasius in 831, De corpore et sanguine domini, to the festival in its honor proposed by Juliana of Liège four centuries later, the Feast of Corpus Christi, the consumption of Christ’s body and blood lay at the forefront of theological debate and popular devotion throughout the later Middle Ages. As theologians assessed the nature of Christ’s presence in the host through forays into natural philosophy and metaphysics, believers professed its power through bouts of ecstasy and preparatory fasts. Welcoming a range of disciplines and media, this panel will examine the development of Eucharistic thought vis-à-vis medieval rituals of consumption, both sacred and profane.

Christiana T. Purdy Moudarres