Session Title

Advances in Medieval Archaeology I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Archaeology, Univ. of Reading

Organizer Name

Gabor Thomas

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Presider Name

Grenville Astill

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 1

Objects in Medieval Graves: Social Identity and Spiritual Well-Being

Presenter 1 Name

Roberta Gilchrist

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 2

Child Health in Medieval England: Gathering the Evidence

Presenter 2 Name

Mary Lewis

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 3

Adolescent Life in Medieval England: Biology and Society

Presenter 3 Name

Fiona Shapland

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 4

You Are What You Eat: Isotopic Approaches to Medieval Identity

Presenter 4 Name

Gundula Müldner

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Start Date

9-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

Combining both new readings of funerary archaeology (Gilchrist), and innovative approaches in paleopathology (Lewis, Shapland) and bone chemistry analysis (Müldner), this session explores some of the latest developments in the archaeology of medieval death and burial. The session brings into sharp focus how diet, health and mobility were experienced by different sectors of medieval society in daily life and also the distinct ways in which the diversity of medieval social identities was given direct cultural expression within the grave.

Gabor Thomas

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May 9th, 1:30 PM

Advances in Medieval Archaeology I

Fetzer 1005

Combining both new readings of funerary archaeology (Gilchrist), and innovative approaches in paleopathology (Lewis, Shapland) and bone chemistry analysis (Müldner), this session explores some of the latest developments in the archaeology of medieval death and burial. The session brings into sharp focus how diet, health and mobility were experienced by different sectors of medieval society in daily life and also the distinct ways in which the diversity of medieval social identities was given direct cultural expression within the grave.

Gabor Thomas