Session Title

Lowe and Beyond: New Directions in Research at the Centenary of The Beneventan Script (1914-2014) I

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Beneventan Studies

Organizer Name

Andrew J. M. Irving

Organizer Affiliation

General Theological Seminary

Presider Name

Richard F. Gyug

Presider Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Paper Title 1

Lowe and Beyond: Beneventan-Script Studies since 1914

Presenter 1 Name

Roger E. Reynolds

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies

Paper Title 2

Looking Beneath the Asterisk: Variability and Codicological Description of Cassinese Manuscripts

Presenter 2 Name

Andrew J. M. Irving

Paper Title 3

The Logic of Early Medieval Medicine: Texts from Montecassino (MSS 69 and 97)

Presenter 3 Name

Jeffrey Doolittle

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Start Date

9-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

2014 marks the centenary of the publication of E. A. Lowe’s The Beneventan Script (1914). As Virginia Brown wrote in her study of Lowe's work, this seminal treatment of the distinctive script of southern Italy and the Dalmatian coast “quickly became and remains … the classic reference work for the history of Beneventan; it is still the only biography of any medieval script.” It has remained the indispensable handbook not only for palaeographers, but for religious and cultural historians, classicists, medieval Latinists, and historians of Southern Italy, medicine, theology, liturgy, monasticism, and art whose written sources were copied in this distinctive minuscule. The six papers in the two proposed sessions (I & II) not only celebrate the legacy of Lowe’s accomplishment, but point to new directions in research on Beneventan sources.

Andrew J. M. Irving

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 9th, 1:30 PM

Lowe and Beyond: New Directions in Research at the Centenary of The Beneventan Script (1914-2014) I

Schneider 1275

2014 marks the centenary of the publication of E. A. Lowe’s The Beneventan Script (1914). As Virginia Brown wrote in her study of Lowe's work, this seminal treatment of the distinctive script of southern Italy and the Dalmatian coast “quickly became and remains … the classic reference work for the history of Beneventan; it is still the only biography of any medieval script.” It has remained the indispensable handbook not only for palaeographers, but for religious and cultural historians, classicists, medieval Latinists, and historians of Southern Italy, medicine, theology, liturgy, monasticism, and art whose written sources were copied in this distinctive minuscule. The six papers in the two proposed sessions (I & II) not only celebrate the legacy of Lowe’s accomplishment, but point to new directions in research on Beneventan sources.

Andrew J. M. Irving