Session Title

Imagining the Passion in a Multiconfessional Castile I: Christ and Mary Divinized

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Association for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

Organizer Name

Jessica A. Boon

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Presider Name

Laura Delbrugge

Presider Affiliation

Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania

Paper Title 1

Reassessing the Passion in _La passion del eterno principe_ (Burgos 1493)

Presenter 1 Name

Isidro J. Rivera

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Kansas

Paper Title 2

Style as Symbolic Form: The Relationship between Aesthetics and Devotion in Post-1492 Isabelline Spain

Presenter 2 Name

Jessica Weiss

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Paper Title 3

Imagining the Passion in Isabelline Spain: Mary and the Jews

Presenter 3 Name

Jessica A. Boon

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

James D'Emilio

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of South Florida

Start Date

9-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Description

Cynthia Robinson’s 2013 publication, Imagining the Passion in a Multiconfessional Castile: The Virgin, Christ, Devotions, and Images in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries (Penn State Press), is being hailed as a “frame-breaking” work that radically challenges current assumptions that Castilian Christianity paralleled European trends before 1492. Robinson’s work is the first of its kind to draw together a wide range of cultic images and spiritual texts from across Iberia and across religious distinctions, and her analysis reveals that late medieval Castilians focused their devotions on Christ’s divinity and Mary’s divine qualities rather than on Christ’s painful suffering. Robinson locates this ‘Castilian particularity’ in the influence of the Catalan Eiximenis’ Vita Christi rather than extra-peninsular texts such as Pseudo-Bonaventure’s Meditaciones Vitae Christi, a forceful argument that requires scholars of Castilian spirituality to rethink the panorama of Christian devotion within the contours of the peninsula instead of gesturing to broader European movements. This session seeks papers that take up Robinson’s call to integrate the study of art history with the study of devotional texts, or that address the influence of peninsular devotion to Mary on the development of a unique Castilian Passion spirituality, or that consider the shift in Passion spirituality post 1492 once interest in Christ’s suffering is newly introduced to Castile.

Jessica A. Boon

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 9th, 1:30 PM

Imagining the Passion in a Multiconfessional Castile I: Christ and Mary Divinized

Bernhard Brown & Gold Room

Cynthia Robinson’s 2013 publication, Imagining the Passion in a Multiconfessional Castile: The Virgin, Christ, Devotions, and Images in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries (Penn State Press), is being hailed as a “frame-breaking” work that radically challenges current assumptions that Castilian Christianity paralleled European trends before 1492. Robinson’s work is the first of its kind to draw together a wide range of cultic images and spiritual texts from across Iberia and across religious distinctions, and her analysis reveals that late medieval Castilians focused their devotions on Christ’s divinity and Mary’s divine qualities rather than on Christ’s painful suffering. Robinson locates this ‘Castilian particularity’ in the influence of the Catalan Eiximenis’ Vita Christi rather than extra-peninsular texts such as Pseudo-Bonaventure’s Meditaciones Vitae Christi, a forceful argument that requires scholars of Castilian spirituality to rethink the panorama of Christian devotion within the contours of the peninsula instead of gesturing to broader European movements. This session seeks papers that take up Robinson’s call to integrate the study of art history with the study of devotional texts, or that address the influence of peninsular devotion to Mary on the development of a unique Castilian Passion spirituality, or that consider the shift in Passion spirituality post 1492 once interest in Christ’s suffering is newly introduced to Castile.

Jessica A. Boon