Session Title

Advances in Medieval Archaeology II: Archaeological Approaches to Medieval Religious Identity

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of Archaeology, Univ. of Reading

Organizer Name

Gabor Thomas

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Presider Name

Roberta Gilchrist

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 1

A Window on Early Medieval Christianization: The Social Dynamics of Monastic Foundation at Anglo-Saxon Lyminge, Kent

Presenter 1 Name

Gabor Thomas

Paper Title 2

Old Gods and New Worldviews: Ritual Action and Negotiating Christian Conversion in Anglo-Saxon England

Presenter 2 Name

Alexandra E. S. Knox (Tashjian Travel Award Winner)

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 3

In the Shadow of the Militarized Church: Crusading and Pagan-Christian Interfaces in the Medieval Eastern Baltic

Presenter 3 Name

Aleks Pluskowski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Paper Title 4

The Permeable Precinct: Late Medieval Monastic Identities: Bordesley and Beyond

Presenter 4 Name

Grenville Astill

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Reading

Start Date

9-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1005

Description

The overarching theme of this session is the role that material practices play in the maintenance and transformation of medieval religious identities, explored through a range of social and geographical scales. A key focus is the exploitation of archaeological approaches to generate more complex narratives of how religious identities were negotiated under the interacting influence of local and regional forces, whether in contexts of active Christian conversion (Thomas, Knox and Pluskowski) or within the more formal framework of later medieval monasteries (Astill).

Gabor Thomas

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Advances in Medieval Archaeology II: Archaeological Approaches to Medieval Religious Identity

Fetzer 1005

The overarching theme of this session is the role that material practices play in the maintenance and transformation of medieval religious identities, explored through a range of social and geographical scales. A key focus is the exploitation of archaeological approaches to generate more complex narratives of how religious identities were negotiated under the interacting influence of local and regional forces, whether in contexts of active Christian conversion (Thomas, Knox and Pluskowski) or within the more formal framework of later medieval monasteries (Astill).

Gabor Thomas