Session Title

New Methods in Anglo-Saxon Homiletics

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics (SSASH)

Organizer Name

Brandon W. Hawk

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Connecticut

Presider Name

Stephen Harris

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Massachusetts-Amherst

Paper Title 1

"It maie be Alfricus for al my conninge": Authorizing Ælfric in the Long Seventeenth Century

Presenter 1 Name

R. Scott Bevill

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 2

Ut quidam perverse opinantur: Bede's Criticism of Unnamed Sources

Presenter 2 Name

Damian Fleming

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Purdue Univ.-Fort Wayne

Paper Title 3

People of the Bread and the Book: Ecclesiology and the Eucharist in Ælfric’s Catholic Homilies

Presenter 3 Name

Rae Grabowski

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Cornell Univ.

Start Date

8-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1325

Description

This session seeks to renew the presence of the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at Kalamazoo, as well as vibrant scholarship and collaborative thinking about new directions for the field. Over the years, the Society has fostered a wide range of interests and methodologies both old and new: for example, source studies, Anglo-Saxon theologies, rhetoric and style, linguistics and philology, the interplay of Christian and pagan practices, paleography and codicology, afterlives of Anglo-Saxon homilies, translation theories, gender studies, and digital initiatives. This session provides a welcome forum for continued discussion of such issues of central importance to Anglo-Saxon studies, especially focused on new avenues of study in the field of homiletics.

Brandon W. Hawk

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May 8th, 10:00 AM

New Methods in Anglo-Saxon Homiletics

Schneider 1325

This session seeks to renew the presence of the Society for the Study of Anglo-Saxon Homiletics at Kalamazoo, as well as vibrant scholarship and collaborative thinking about new directions for the field. Over the years, the Society has fostered a wide range of interests and methodologies both old and new: for example, source studies, Anglo-Saxon theologies, rhetoric and style, linguistics and philology, the interplay of Christian and pagan practices, paleography and codicology, afterlives of Anglo-Saxon homilies, translation theories, gender studies, and digital initiatives. This session provides a welcome forum for continued discussion of such issues of central importance to Anglo-Saxon studies, especially focused on new avenues of study in the field of homiletics.

Brandon W. Hawk