Session Title

European Countercurrents: English Influence on Continental Literature during the Long Twelfth Century

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval Literature, Syddansk Univ. and Univ. of York

Organizer Name

George Younge

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of York

Presider Name

Margaret Healy-Varley

Presider Affiliation

Providence College

Paper Title 1

The First Variant’s Impact on Insular and Continental Presentations of Britain’s Language History

Presenter 1 Name

Sara Harris

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Sidney Sussex College, Univ. of Cambridge

Paper Title 2

Saint Anselm’s Exile of 1097 and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

Presenter 2 Name

George Younge

Paper Title 3

Epic Travels: Anglo-Norman Poetry in Continental Contexts during the Later Twelfth Century

Presenter 3 Name

Venetia Bridges

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of York

Start Date

9-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1340

Description

The profound impact of European literary culture in England during the long twelfth century is a familiar feature of the period. With the Danish and Norman conquests of the eleventh century, England was absorbed into larger northern European literary and cultural networks. Continental personnel, languages, texts and the new learning of the twelfth-century renaissance quickly overlaid and displaced native Anglo-Saxon traditions. But what did England, with its own vibrant literary heritages and cultures, give back to its conquerors, and can such cultural exports be easily identified as ‘English’? The purpose of the session will be to consider the countercurrents that accompanied the process of reception in England, exploring the reciprocal influence of ‘English’ literature and culture on neighbouring European areas.

George R. Younge

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

European Countercurrents: English Influence on Continental Literature during the Long Twelfth Century

Schneider 1340

The profound impact of European literary culture in England during the long twelfth century is a familiar feature of the period. With the Danish and Norman conquests of the eleventh century, England was absorbed into larger northern European literary and cultural networks. Continental personnel, languages, texts and the new learning of the twelfth-century renaissance quickly overlaid and displaced native Anglo-Saxon traditions. But what did England, with its own vibrant literary heritages and cultures, give back to its conquerors, and can such cultural exports be easily identified as ‘English’? The purpose of the session will be to consider the countercurrents that accompanied the process of reception in England, exploring the reciprocal influence of ‘English’ literature and culture on neighbouring European areas.

George R. Younge