Session Title

Archbishop Wulfstan and the Sermo Lupi ad Anglos

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval-Renaissance Faculty Workshop, Univ. of Louisville

Organizer Name

Andrew Rabin

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Louisville

Presider Name

Jay Paul Gates

Presider Affiliation

John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Paper Title 1

Wulfstan's Improvisational Style

Presenter 1 Name

Emily Butler

Presenter 1 Affiliation

John Carroll Univ.

Paper Title 2

Gifts or Payments? Almsgiving and Church Dues in the Homilies and Laws of Archbishop Wulfstan

Presenter 2 Name

Aleisha Olson

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Drake Univ.

Paper Title 3

Apocalypse and Atonement in Later Æthelredian England

Presenter 3 Name

Levi Roach

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Exeter

Start Date

9-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 211

Description

The purpose of this session is to commemorate the millenary of one of the most important prose compositions of the later Anglo-Saxon period, Archbishop Wulfstan's 1014 Sermo Lupi ad Anglos. We invite papers covering all aspects of Archbishop Wulfstan's career as "homilist and statesman," to borrow Dorothy Whitelock's famous formulation. We are eager to receive submissions representing a variety of perspectives, methodologies, and disciplines. We welcome traditional philological and historicist approaches, as well as those informed by modern critical theory. Archbishop Wulfstan is perhaps the most important and influential political thinker of the later Anglo-Saxon period, and this session offers a valuable opportunity to reassess his legacy.

Andrew Rabin

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May 9th, 3:30 PM

Archbishop Wulfstan and the Sermo Lupi ad Anglos

Bernhard 211

The purpose of this session is to commemorate the millenary of one of the most important prose compositions of the later Anglo-Saxon period, Archbishop Wulfstan's 1014 Sermo Lupi ad Anglos. We invite papers covering all aspects of Archbishop Wulfstan's career as "homilist and statesman," to borrow Dorothy Whitelock's famous formulation. We are eager to receive submissions representing a variety of perspectives, methodologies, and disciplines. We welcome traditional philological and historicist approaches, as well as those informed by modern critical theory. Archbishop Wulfstan is perhaps the most important and influential political thinker of the later Anglo-Saxon period, and this session offers a valuable opportunity to reassess his legacy.

Andrew Rabin