Session Title

Manuscript Context for Early Anglo-Saxon, Caroline, and Germanic Verse

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Bruce Gilchrist

Organizer Affiliation

Concordia Univ. Montréal

Presider Name

Ilya V. Sverdlov

Presider Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 1

The Prehistory of MS Junius 11

Presenter 1 Name

A. N. Doane

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 2

Manuscript Layout, Old English Poems, and Visual Lineation: Reassessing the Uses of Aural Verses and Visual Lines in Modern Translation

Presenter 2 Name

Derek Updegraff

Presenter 2 Affiliation

California Baptist Univ.

Paper Title 3

Manuscript Context for the Boethian Metra in MS Cotton Vespasian D.xiv

Presenter 3 Name

Bruce Gilchrist

Start Date

10-5-2014 10:00 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1145

Description

This session considers the manuscript context—palaeography, codicology, and related matters—for early Anglo-Saxon, Caroline and/or Germanic verse. It seeks to answer a few simple questions: how did verse first get written down? were there connections in formal technique between the continent and England? what manuscript markings and layout strategies were taken to demarcate verse from prose?

Keywords:

A.N. Doane -- Junius 11, Genesis A + B, Exodus, Daniel, Old Saxon Genesis, codicology, layout, manuscript design

Derek Updegraff -- Modern edition layout for Anglo-Saxon poems

Bruce Gilchrist -- Cotton Vespasian D.xiv, Boethius, metra, 1m1, flyleaves, Isidore, Synonyma, Hymns, errors in catalogue, palaeography, punctuation, transitional square minuscule, King Alfred, Alfred's translation of Boethius, Consolatio / Consolation of Philosophy

Bruce Gilchrist

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May 10th, 10:00 AM

Manuscript Context for Early Anglo-Saxon, Caroline, and Germanic Verse

Schneider 1145

This session considers the manuscript context—palaeography, codicology, and related matters—for early Anglo-Saxon, Caroline and/or Germanic verse. It seeks to answer a few simple questions: how did verse first get written down? were there connections in formal technique between the continent and England? what manuscript markings and layout strategies were taken to demarcate verse from prose?

Keywords:

A.N. Doane -- Junius 11, Genesis A + B, Exodus, Daniel, Old Saxon Genesis, codicology, layout, manuscript design

Derek Updegraff -- Modern edition layout for Anglo-Saxon poems

Bruce Gilchrist -- Cotton Vespasian D.xiv, Boethius, metra, 1m1, flyleaves, Isidore, Synonyma, Hymns, errors in catalogue, palaeography, punctuation, transitional square minuscule, King Alfred, Alfred's translation of Boethius, Consolatio / Consolation of Philosophy

Bruce Gilchrist