Session Title

Place of Reading in Medieval Benedictine Monasticism

Sponsoring Organization(s)

American Benedictine Academy

Organizer Name

Hugh Bernard Feiss, OSB

Organizer Affiliation

Monastery of the Ascension

Presider Name

Colleen Maura McGrane, OSB

Presider Affiliation

Benedictine Sisters of Perpetual Adoration

Paper Title 1

Lectio Divina and Cynewulf's Epilogues

Presenter 1 Name

Jacob Riyeff

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Notre Dame

Paper Title 2

Food for the Soul: The Reading and Writing of Peter of Celle's De panibus

Presenter 2 Name

Hugh Bernard Feiss, OSB

Paper Title 3

Abstinence and Lectio Regularis: The Place of Dietary Regulation in Benedictine Reading Culture

Presenter 3 Name

Torsten K. Edstam

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Chicago

Start Date

10-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson 303

Description

This session considers the place of reading in Medieval Benedictine monasticism. In this session devoted to lectio divina in medieval Benedictine monasticism, Jacob Riyeff (University of Notre Dame) considers lectio divina and Old English poetry (Caedmon and Cynewulf's Epilogues). Hugh Feiss (Monastery of the Ascension) studies what Peter of Celle's De panibus can tell us about the writing of works for lectio divina and their reception. Torsten Edstam (University of Chicago) examines the connection made between fasting and reading in the Libellus de studio lectionis spiritualis of Johannes Wischler von Speyer, a leading figure of the Melk Reform of the fifteenth-century.

Hugh B. Feiss

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Place of Reading in Medieval Benedictine Monasticism

Valley III Stinson 303

This session considers the place of reading in Medieval Benedictine monasticism. In this session devoted to lectio divina in medieval Benedictine monasticism, Jacob Riyeff (University of Notre Dame) considers lectio divina and Old English poetry (Caedmon and Cynewulf's Epilogues). Hugh Feiss (Monastery of the Ascension) studies what Peter of Celle's De panibus can tell us about the writing of works for lectio divina and their reception. Torsten Edstam (University of Chicago) examines the connection made between fasting and reading in the Libellus de studio lectionis spiritualis of Johannes Wischler von Speyer, a leading figure of the Melk Reform of the fifteenth-century.

Hugh B. Feiss