Session Title

Teaching the History of the Spanish Language: New Challenges and Opportunities (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies (HSMS)

Organizer Name

Pablo Pastrana-Pérez

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Gabriel Rei-Doval

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Paper Title 1

Goals and Challenges of Teaching Old Spanish and Romance Linguistics from a Historical Perspective in an M.A. program

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Willingham

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Baylor Univ.

Paper Title 2

Changes in the Second Edition of Breve historia

Presenter 2 Name

David A. Pharies

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Paper Title 3

Rebuilding the Spanish Language from the Bottom Up

Presenter 3 Name

Yasmine Beale-Rivaya

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Texas State Univ.

Paper Title 4

Making "History of the Language" Relevant Today

Presenter 4 Name

Donald N. Tuten

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Emory Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2014 1:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

The HSMS sponsored very successful roundtable sessions dedicated to "The teaching of the History of the Spanish language" a few years ago. In 2007 the focus was the discussion of textbooks and secondary sources, while in 2008 we discussed the form and function of primary sources. In 2009 a group of invited scholars presented the results of ongoing work on an online repository of materials for the teaching of the History of the Spanish Language. The most pressing issue at the moment, and the intended focus of this session, is the integration of materials -textbooks and primary sources alike- both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Much remains to be done in order to make the material both deliverable and palatable to undergraduate students, while maintaining rigor has been the challenge at the graduate level. How to incorporate Latin to an increasing number of students who lack the basic training in Classical languages, or how much emphasis there should be on medieval Castilian are two of the most difficult challenges. Although, traditionally, the course has been a pillar of Hispanic doctoral studies, with the advent of cultural studies, it has been under pressure to the point of being eliminated or watered down in an increasing number of U.S. universities. This session will also seek to address the need to keep the course content accessible and more hands-on with the use of the new digital technologies.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez

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May 10th, 1:30 PM

Teaching the History of the Spanish Language: New Challenges and Opportunities (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 1010

The HSMS sponsored very successful roundtable sessions dedicated to "The teaching of the History of the Spanish language" a few years ago. In 2007 the focus was the discussion of textbooks and secondary sources, while in 2008 we discussed the form and function of primary sources. In 2009 a group of invited scholars presented the results of ongoing work on an online repository of materials for the teaching of the History of the Spanish Language. The most pressing issue at the moment, and the intended focus of this session, is the integration of materials -textbooks and primary sources alike- both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Much remains to be done in order to make the material both deliverable and palatable to undergraduate students, while maintaining rigor has been the challenge at the graduate level. How to incorporate Latin to an increasing number of students who lack the basic training in Classical languages, or how much emphasis there should be on medieval Castilian are two of the most difficult challenges. Although, traditionally, the course has been a pillar of Hispanic doctoral studies, with the advent of cultural studies, it has been under pressure to the point of being eliminated or watered down in an increasing number of U.S. universities. This session will also seek to address the need to keep the course content accessible and more hands-on with the use of the new digital technologies.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez