Session Title

Of Whom Shall I Be Afraid? Enemies in the Medieval Period

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies

Organizer Name

Emerson Storm Fillman Richards

Organizer Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Presider Name

Sebastian Rider-Bezerra

Presider Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 1

(Former) Enemies at the Gates: Insinuations of Betrayal in "Pa gur yv y porthaur"

Presenter 1 Name

Edward Mead Bowen

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Aberystwyth Univ.

Paper Title 2

"Into That Vile Countreye": Figuring Ethnic Enmity with Gog and Magog in Kyng Alisaunder

Presenter 2 Name

Josephine Livingstone

Presenter 2 Affiliation

New York Univ.

Paper Title 3

"Ni e yo amigo, ni enemigo": Enmity, Trust, and Betrayal in Thirteenth-Century Iberia

Presenter 3 Name

Antonella Luizzo Scorpo

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Lincoln

Paper Title 4

Franks and Scandinavians: Good Neighbors / Bad Neighbors

Presenter 4 Name

Daniel F. Melleno

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Start Date

10-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

The breadth of this session allows for interdisciplinary exchanges on the particularities enemies in literature, history, and politics to more nuanced interpretations of the notion of enmity in the medieval period. Some questions this session seeks to pose and answer are: How are enemies identified, constructed, dealt with and described? What were the ramifications of enmity among individuals or groups? How, and could, enmity be overcome? Were enemies always the "other"? What about non-human enemies?

Emerson S. Richards

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Of Whom Shall I Be Afraid? Enemies in the Medieval Period

Valley III Stinson Lounge

The breadth of this session allows for interdisciplinary exchanges on the particularities enemies in literature, history, and politics to more nuanced interpretations of the notion of enmity in the medieval period. Some questions this session seeks to pose and answer are: How are enemies identified, constructed, dealt with and described? What were the ramifications of enmity among individuals or groups? How, and could, enmity be overcome? Were enemies always the "other"? What about non-human enemies?

Emerson S. Richards