Session Title

Language and Identity in Medieval Iberia

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Hispanic Seminary of Medieval Studies (HSMS)

Organizer Name

Pablo Pastrana-Pérez

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Francisco Gago-Jover

Presider Affiliation

College of the Holy Cross

Paper Title 1

Remembering Hispania

Presenter 1 Name

Graham Barrett

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St John's College, Univ. of Oxford

Paper Title 2

The Rhetoric of Identity in Ninth-Century Cordoba: Samson's Apologeticus

Presenter 2 Name

Jason Busic

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Denison Univ.

Paper Title 3

Languages and Identities in the Crown of Aragon: Heredia and Eiximenis

Presenter 3 Name

Vicente Lledó-Guillem

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Hofstra Univ.

Paper Title 4

Scribes and Their Language: From Local to "Standard"

Presenter 4 Name

David Mackenzie

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. College Cork

Start Date

10-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

Medieval Iberia appears as a multilingual space in which different languages co-existed, competed and even negotiated with one another for a long period of time. Language became the corner stone of different political, cultural, and religious identities. This panel explores not only the process of identity creation by means of language, but also how these linguistic identities became naturalized and accepted. We welcome abstracts that deal with Arabic, Castilian, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, Hebrew, Mossarabic and any other Iberian language that may help us understand how Medieval Iberia was divided according to linguistic differences.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Language and Identity in Medieval Iberia

Fetzer 1010

Medieval Iberia appears as a multilingual space in which different languages co-existed, competed and even negotiated with one another for a long period of time. Language became the corner stone of different political, cultural, and religious identities. This panel explores not only the process of identity creation by means of language, but also how these linguistic identities became naturalized and accepted. We welcome abstracts that deal with Arabic, Castilian, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, Hebrew, Mossarabic and any other Iberian language that may help us understand how Medieval Iberia was divided according to linguistic differences.

Pablo M. Pastrana-Pérez