Session Title

Innovative Approaches to Teaching Dante (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

Organizer Name

Alison Langdon

Organizer Affiliation

Western Kentucky Univ.

Presider Name

David Sprunger

Presider Affiliation

Concordia College

Paper Title 1

Teaching Vita nuova: Values in Public and Private Prophecy

Presenter 1 Name

Edward Risden

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St. Norbert College

Paper Title 2

Explicating Hell: A Whole-Class Lectura Dantis

Presenter 2 Name

Alison Langdon

Paper Title 3

Dante as a Journey into the Renaissance

Presenter 3 Name

Tovah Bender

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Florida International Univ.

Paper Title 4

Learning by Doing: Teaching Dante Kinesthetically

Presenter 4 Name

Susanne Hafner

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Fordham Univ.

Start Date

10-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1140

Description

This session will be a roundtable discussion on teaching modules that focus on topics related to Dante and his works. The units could be part of classes devoted entirely to Dante or Dante units within classes on broader topics. Unlike other sessions that concentrate on philosophical or critical approaches for design of an entire course, this session would emphasize ideas for particular assignments (papers, units, or projects). Projects could be self-contained or parts of larger scaffolded assignments. As faculty and students seek new ways of teaching and being taught, medievalists need to hear of innovative teaching strategies that have worked for colleagues.

Alison Langdon

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Innovative Approaches to Teaching Dante (A Roundtable)

Schneider 1140

This session will be a roundtable discussion on teaching modules that focus on topics related to Dante and his works. The units could be part of classes devoted entirely to Dante or Dante units within classes on broader topics. Unlike other sessions that concentrate on philosophical or critical approaches for design of an entire course, this session would emphasize ideas for particular assignments (papers, units, or projects). Projects could be self-contained or parts of larger scaffolded assignments. As faculty and students seek new ways of teaching and being taught, medievalists need to hear of innovative teaching strategies that have worked for colleagues.

Alison Langdon