Session Title

Medieval Traditions in Post-Medieval Iceland: Literature and Manuscripts

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for the Advancement of Scandinavian Studies

Organizer Name

Silvia Hufnagel

Organizer Affiliation

Arnamagnæan Institute

Presider Name

Shaun F. D. Hughes

Presider Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 1

Manuscripts and Literature in Iceland from the Middle Ages Onwards

Presenter 1 Name

Silvia Hufnagel

Paper Title 2

The Younger Flateyjarbók’ and Other Private Manuscripts of Njáls saga

Presenter 2 Name

Susanne M. Arthur

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

Paper Title 3

Northern Legends in Verse: The Fornaldarrímur

Presenter 3 Name

Jeffrey Love

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Arnamagnæan Institute

Start Date

10-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1350

Description

In Iceland works of literature were transmitted in manuscripts until the end of the nineteenth century. Although the printing press came already around 1530 to Iceland, it was in the hands of the Church who had no interest to print anything else than religious and liturgical matters. Therefore other matters, including literature, had to be copied by hand. This medieval tradition of the production, dissemination and reception of manuscripts and literature in post-medieval times has in recent years attracted the attention of a growing number of scholars. The proposed session is perceived as a platform to present and discuss recent scholarship in the fields of Icelandic manuscript and literary studies, with a specific focus on the long life of traditions and their extension, including their transformation, from the Middle Ages into more recent times.

Shaun F. D. Hughes

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May 10th, 3:30 PM

Medieval Traditions in Post-Medieval Iceland: Literature and Manuscripts

Schneider 1350

In Iceland works of literature were transmitted in manuscripts until the end of the nineteenth century. Although the printing press came already around 1530 to Iceland, it was in the hands of the Church who had no interest to print anything else than religious and liturgical matters. Therefore other matters, including literature, had to be copied by hand. This medieval tradition of the production, dissemination and reception of manuscripts and literature in post-medieval times has in recent years attracted the attention of a growing number of scholars. The proposed session is perceived as a platform to present and discuss recent scholarship in the fields of Icelandic manuscript and literary studies, with a specific focus on the long life of traditions and their extension, including their transformation, from the Middle Ages into more recent times.

Shaun F. D. Hughes