Session Title

Interdisciplinarity in Twenty-First-Century Medieval Studies: Archaeoscience, Advanced Methodologies, and Consilience

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Dept. of History, Univ. of Southern California

Organizer Name

Justin Haar

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Presider Name

Patrick Wyman

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Southern California

Paper Title 1

Old Hermeneutics and New Faces

Presenter 1 Name

Andrew Eichel

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Paper Title 2

Cloud Sourced Data: Working with Lidar in Landscape Archaeology

Presenter 2 Name

Jennifer L. Immich

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Twin Cities

Paper Title 3

Respondent

Presenter 3 Name

Bonnie Effros

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Florida/Institute for Advanced Study

Start Date

10-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 158

Description

Given the relative paucity of our source material, interdisciplinarity has long been a hallmark of medieval studies. Disciplines ranging from archaeology to philology have left their marks on the study of the medieval past. Today, this fruitful process continues with the application of archaeoscience, genetics, palaeoepidemiology, advanced landscape analysis, behavioral modeling, and environmental studies to historical analysis. These exciting new tools have the capacity to transform our understanding of lived experience during the Middle Ages, yet offer substantial challenges in terms of adapting new methodologies and integrating multiple lines of evidence. Should we expect radically different kinds of evidence to agree with one another and in what ways? How can we integrate multiple bodies of source material into a holistic whole? Should we? Most importantly, what opportunities and problems do these methods offer us as medievalists?

This will be a broad panel, ranging from the practical application of these modes of analysis to the epistemological consequences of introducing new methodologies to the study of the Middle Ages.

Justin D. Haar

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 10th, 3:30 PM

Interdisciplinarity in Twenty-First-Century Medieval Studies: Archaeoscience, Advanced Methodologies, and Consilience

Bernhard 158

Given the relative paucity of our source material, interdisciplinarity has long been a hallmark of medieval studies. Disciplines ranging from archaeology to philology have left their marks on the study of the medieval past. Today, this fruitful process continues with the application of archaeoscience, genetics, palaeoepidemiology, advanced landscape analysis, behavioral modeling, and environmental studies to historical analysis. These exciting new tools have the capacity to transform our understanding of lived experience during the Middle Ages, yet offer substantial challenges in terms of adapting new methodologies and integrating multiple lines of evidence. Should we expect radically different kinds of evidence to agree with one another and in what ways? How can we integrate multiple bodies of source material into a holistic whole? Should we? Most importantly, what opportunities and problems do these methods offer us as medievalists?

This will be a broad panel, ranging from the practical application of these modes of analysis to the epistemological consequences of introducing new methodologies to the study of the Middle Ages.

Justin D. Haar