Session Title

Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Nicole Marafioti, Jay Paul Gates

Organizer Affiliation

Trinity Univ., John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY

Presider Name

Nicole Marafioti

Paper Title 1

The Beginnings of Punishment?

Presenter 1 Name

Daniela Fruscione

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Univ. Frankfurt am Main

Paper Title 2

Penance and Punishment

Presenter 2 Name

Stefan Jurasinski

Presenter 2 Affiliation

SUNY-Brockport

Paper Title 3

The Case for Anglo-Saxon Continuity: Some Off-Hand Thoughts

Presenter 3 Name

Daniel O'Gorman

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Loyola Univ. Chicago

Paper Title 4

Innovation and Retention in Genital Mutilation

Presenter 4 Name

Lisi Oliver

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Louisiana State Univ.

Paper Title 5

The Politics of Capital Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England: How to Get a Head

Presenter 5 Name

Andrew Rabin

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Louisville

Paper Title 6

A Response to Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England

Presenter 6 Name

Jay Paul Gates

Start Date

11-5-2014 10:30 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2020

Description

Treatments of capital and corporal punishment appeared in various contexts during the Anglo-Saxon period. In addition to the Old English law codes that prescribed death and mutilation for criminal offenders, physical penalties figured prominently in literary texts, theological writings, works of art, and the archaeology of the Anglo-Saxon landscape. This roundtable discussion will focus on the evidence and contexts for punishment in the Anglo-Saxon period and consider directions for future research.

Nicole Marafioti

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May 11th, 10:30 AM

Capital and Corporal Punishment in Anglo-Saxon England (A Roundtable)

Fetzer 2020

Treatments of capital and corporal punishment appeared in various contexts during the Anglo-Saxon period. In addition to the Old English law codes that prescribed death and mutilation for criminal offenders, physical penalties figured prominently in literary texts, theological writings, works of art, and the archaeology of the Anglo-Saxon landscape. This roundtable discussion will focus on the evidence and contexts for punishment in the Anglo-Saxon period and consider directions for future research.

Nicole Marafioti