Session Title

Prescriptions for Well-Being: Food, Bodily Health and Spiritual Health in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages

Organizer Name

John A. Bollweg

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ./College of DuPage

Presider Name

Donna M. Rogers

Presider Affiliation

Brescia Univ. College

Paper Title 1

The Kingdom of God Is Not a Matter of Eating and Drinking: Twelfth-Century Monastic Diet and Interpretation of the Rule of Saint Benedict

Presenter 1 Name

Jack Mallon

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Guelph

Paper Title 2

Food Consumption in The Trotula: Italian Prescription for Health?

Presenter 2 Name

Theresa A. Vaughan

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Central Oklahoma

Paper Title 3

Healing of Disease in the Middle Ages: Foodstuffs as Medicine in the Regiminis sanitatis

Presenter 3 Name

María Margarita Tascón González

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. de León

Paper Title 4

The Salvation Diet

Presenter 4 Name

Martha Daas

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Old Dominion Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2014 10:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1265

Description

Medieval physicians recognized food and diet as contributors to healthy and diseased complexions or temperaments, while the doctors of the Church understood abstinence and gluttony to affect spiritual health. Medical and culinary practices were similarly intertwined: not only did physicians rely on foodstuffs to aid patients, but cooks -- working with physicians -- incorporated medical theory into their cooking practices. For this session Mens et Mensa sought papers that explore practical, medical and theological/moral/pastoral uses, interpretations and representations of food and the ideas, practices or artifacts associated with food, as a help or hindrance to bodily or spiritual health in the Middle Ages (500 - 1500 CE). Topics that are of interest include, but are not limited to, food and heresy, religious fasting, relationship between food and medicine in cookbooks, herbals, trades on the border between food and medicine (e.g., spicers and grocers), foods that might injure one's bodily or spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and good temperament and behavior.

John A. Bollweg

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May 11th, 10:30 AM

Prescriptions for Well-Being: Food, Bodily Health and Spiritual Health in the Middle Ages

Schneider 1265

Medieval physicians recognized food and diet as contributors to healthy and diseased complexions or temperaments, while the doctors of the Church understood abstinence and gluttony to affect spiritual health. Medical and culinary practices were similarly intertwined: not only did physicians rely on foodstuffs to aid patients, but cooks -- working with physicians -- incorporated medical theory into their cooking practices. For this session Mens et Mensa sought papers that explore practical, medical and theological/moral/pastoral uses, interpretations and representations of food and the ideas, practices or artifacts associated with food, as a help or hindrance to bodily or spiritual health in the Middle Ages (500 - 1500 CE). Topics that are of interest include, but are not limited to, food and heresy, religious fasting, relationship between food and medicine in cookbooks, herbals, trades on the border between food and medicine (e.g., spicers and grocers), foods that might injure one's bodily or spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and spiritual health, the relationship between bodily health and good temperament and behavior.

John A. Bollweg