Session Title

The Composite City

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Thomas Devaney

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Rochester

Presider Name

Thomas Devaney

Paper Title 1

Discussing London and Londoners within the Angevin Regnum Anglorum

Presenter 1 Name

Katherine Har

Presenter 1 Affiliation

St Edmund Hall, Univ. of Oxford

Paper Title 2

"Hayll and welcome of all abowte / To owre ceté": Constructing Spaces and Urban Identities through Drama in Late Medieval York

Presenter 2 Name

Meisha Lohmann

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Binghamton Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2014 10:30 AM

Session Location

Schneider 1280

Description

Despite the efforts of many municipal corporations to present their cities as unified and harmonious, medieval urban communities were seldom homogenous in either composition or outlook. City dwellers might subscribe to a variety of corporate identities—including those based on occupation, gender, religion, origin, or status—of which their residence was only one, and not necessarily the most important. Although scholars have long recognized that interaction between such groups was a core aspect of urban experience, more recent work in a variety of disciplines has expanded our knowledge of the ways in which civic life was conditioned by a range of spatial, cultural, social, and economic hybridities. These interactions and borrowings (as well as attempts to control or suppress them) created dynamic local power structures and fostered new modes of identity formation while transforming contemporary understandings of urban society. The papers on this panel examine, from an interdisciplinary perspective, how multiple communities co-existed and competed in York, London, Rouen, and Montpellier.

Thomas Devaney

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May 11th, 10:30 AM

The Composite City

Schneider 1280

Despite the efforts of many municipal corporations to present their cities as unified and harmonious, medieval urban communities were seldom homogenous in either composition or outlook. City dwellers might subscribe to a variety of corporate identities—including those based on occupation, gender, religion, origin, or status—of which their residence was only one, and not necessarily the most important. Although scholars have long recognized that interaction between such groups was a core aspect of urban experience, more recent work in a variety of disciplines has expanded our knowledge of the ways in which civic life was conditioned by a range of spatial, cultural, social, and economic hybridities. These interactions and borrowings (as well as attempts to control or suppress them) created dynamic local power structures and fostered new modes of identity formation while transforming contemporary understandings of urban society. The papers on this panel examine, from an interdisciplinary perspective, how multiple communities co-existed and competed in York, London, Rouen, and Montpellier.

Thomas Devaney