Session Title

Reconstruction and Reenactment and Their Role in Recovering History (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Higgins Armory Museum

Organizer Name

Kenneth Mondschein

Organizer Affiliation

Higgins Armory Museum

Presider Name

Kenneth Mondschein

Paper Title 1

Discussant

Presenter 1 Name

Michael A. Cramer

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY

Paper Title 2

Discussant

Presenter 2 Name

Lisa Evans

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Independent Scholar

Paper Title 3

Discussant

Presenter 3 Name

Darrell Markewitz

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Wareham Forge

Paper Title 4

Discussant

Presenter 4 Name

Greg Mele

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Freelance Academy Press

Paper Title 5

Discussant

Presenter 5 Name

Neil Peterson

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Wilfrid Laurier Univ.

Start Date

11-5-2014 10:30 AM

Session Location

Bernhard 210

Description

This past Congress saw several extraordinarily popular and successful reenactment/recreation activities—the judicial duel performance, the wine-hour astrolabe workshop, the plainsong workshop, the iron smelt, and, of course, the medieval beer-tasting. But how useful are such activities to our academic disciplines? Are they valuable to understanding the past, or mere sideshows? How can they increase interest in our subject in an age of reduced budgets and relentless focus on math and science education? How can they find a place in pedagogy without seeming like pandering? How should hiring and tenure committees look at such activities? Finally, what historigraphical issues and difficulties are involved, and how can these distort our view of the past? Several of the participants from this past year's activities have stepped forward to participate in a roundtable to discuss their activities, what insights they provide, and their place within the larger academic discipline.

Kenneth C. Mondschein

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May 11th, 10:30 AM

Reconstruction and Reenactment and Their Role in Recovering History (A Roundtable)

Bernhard 210

This past Congress saw several extraordinarily popular and successful reenactment/recreation activities—the judicial duel performance, the wine-hour astrolabe workshop, the plainsong workshop, the iron smelt, and, of course, the medieval beer-tasting. But how useful are such activities to our academic disciplines? Are they valuable to understanding the past, or mere sideshows? How can they increase interest in our subject in an age of reduced budgets and relentless focus on math and science education? How can they find a place in pedagogy without seeming like pandering? How should hiring and tenure committees look at such activities? Finally, what historigraphical issues and difficulties are involved, and how can these distort our view of the past? Several of the participants from this past year's activities have stepped forward to participate in a roundtable to discuss their activities, what insights they provide, and their place within the larger academic discipline.

Kenneth C. Mondschein