Session Title

Drama, Phenomenology, and Periodization

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Medieval and Renaissance Studies Program, Univ. of Pittsburgh

Organizer Name

Ryan McDermott

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Pittsburgh

Presider Name

Jennifer Waldron

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Pittsburgh

Paper Title 1

Witnessing Invisibility: The Dark Phenomenality of Martyrdom

Presenter 1 Name

Beth Sutherland

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Virginia

Paper Title 2

The Eternity Effect: Anachronism in Medieval Herod Plays

Presenter 2 Name

Helen Cushman

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Harvard Univ.

Paper Title 3

"A word may I speke, no more": The Castle of Perseverance and the Phenomenology of Dying

Presenter 3 Name

Devin Byker

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Boston Univ.

Paper Title 4

Theater of Apocalypse: Cleopatra's Doomsday

Presenter 4 Name

William Junker

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of St. Thomas, Minnesota

Paper Title 5

The Subject of Allegory: Sensation and Subjectivity on the Medieval and Early Modern Stage

Presenter 5 Name

Elizabeth Swann

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Tennessee-Knoxville

Start Date

8-5-2014 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley I Ackley 105

Description

This session aims to rethink narratives of cultural change across the late medieval and early modern periods by bringing together several strands of scholarship that fall under the banner of “phenomenology” but are not usually engaged in direct dialogue. Broadly speaking, those interested in historical phenomenology and in embodied cognition have had little to say to those working in the philosophy of religion, political theology, and ethics. Our objective is to bring these various approaches together in order to open up new perspectives on periodization and to reexamine early drama's role in narratives of secularization and modernization.

Ryan McDermott

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May 8th, 3:30 PM

Drama, Phenomenology, and Periodization

Valley I Ackley 105

This session aims to rethink narratives of cultural change across the late medieval and early modern periods by bringing together several strands of scholarship that fall under the banner of “phenomenology” but are not usually engaged in direct dialogue. Broadly speaking, those interested in historical phenomenology and in embodied cognition have had little to say to those working in the philosophy of religion, political theology, and ethics. Our objective is to bring these various approaches together in order to open up new perspectives on periodization and to reexamine early drama's role in narratives of secularization and modernization.

Ryan McDermott