Session Title

The Cultures of Food in the Middle Ages

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Medieval Congress, Univ. of Leeds

Organizer Name

Axel E. W. Müller

Organizer Affiliation

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Leeds

Presider Name

Paul Freedman

Presider Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 1

Grain for Florence: Sources of Supply, the Grain Market, and the Wider Florentine Food Culture of the Late Thirteenth and Early Fourteenth Century

Presenter 1 Name

Marie D'Aguanno Ito

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Georgetown Univ.

Paper Title 2

"Not Just Loaves and Fishes": The Complexities of Food Provision in European Miracle Collection

Presenter 2 Name

Iona McCleery

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Leeds

Start Date

14-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1350

Description

The exploration of medieval food has moved from a focus on production and supply in recent years to a new interest in consumption. Perhaps unsurprisingly much research on eating practices has developed out of studies of noble and royal households and elite cookery books, and is usually nationally or regionally based. This session considers wider cultural approaches to food which cross regional, national, and social boundaries and makes use of inter-disciplinary methods and neglected sources. The papers will contain ground-breaking research on the overlapping and multiple meanings of food and eating in several different yet interconnected medieval cultures, paying attention to changes over time and to the complex interplay between geography, climate, landscape, religion, status and taste.

Axel E.W. Müller

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 14th, 3:30 PM

The Cultures of Food in the Middle Ages

Schneider 1350

The exploration of medieval food has moved from a focus on production and supply in recent years to a new interest in consumption. Perhaps unsurprisingly much research on eating practices has developed out of studies of noble and royal households and elite cookery books, and is usually nationally or regionally based. This session considers wider cultural approaches to food which cross regional, national, and social boundaries and makes use of inter-disciplinary methods and neglected sources. The papers will contain ground-breaking research on the overlapping and multiple meanings of food and eating in several different yet interconnected medieval cultures, paying attention to changes over time and to the complex interplay between geography, climate, landscape, religion, status and taste.

Axel E.W. Müller