Session Title

The Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe: New Advances in Avar Archaeology II

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Univ. of Florida

Organizer Name

Florin Curta

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Florida

Presider Name

Florin Curta

Paper Title 1

Avar Identities and Their Relation to Remains of the Roman World: An Archaeological Perspective

Presenter 1 Name

Hajnalka Herold

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Exeter

Paper Title 2

Archaeological Approaches to Social Structures in the Late Avar Age (Eighth Century)

Presenter 2 Name

Gergely Szenthe

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Magyar Nemzeti Múzeum

Paper Title 3

The Role of Belt Ornaments Displaying Antique Mythological and Christian Scenes in the Social Representations of the Late Avar Population

Presenter 3 Name

Adam Bollok

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Magyar Tudományos Akadémia

Start Date

14-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 212

Description

Research into material remains of the expressions of social or ethnic identities has recently turned towards a symbolic interpretation of various grave goods and burial customs. Even the proper meaning of the ethnonym as well as the adjective "Avar" requires a certain sort of explanation, since a range of very different attributes (artifacts, ornamental styles, and burial customs) are held to be "typically Avar"--a fact that in itself calls for a reassessment of the "Avar image." Different identities covered by the label "Avar" need special attention considering their dynamically changing nature.

Florin Curta

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

The Archaeology of Early Medieval Europe: New Advances in Avar Archaeology II

Bernhard 212

Research into material remains of the expressions of social or ethnic identities has recently turned towards a symbolic interpretation of various grave goods and burial customs. Even the proper meaning of the ethnonym as well as the adjective "Avar" requires a certain sort of explanation, since a range of very different attributes (artifacts, ornamental styles, and burial customs) are held to be "typically Avar"--a fact that in itself calls for a reassessment of the "Avar image." Different identities covered by the label "Avar" need special attention considering their dynamically changing nature.

Florin Curta