Session Title

Selfhood in Nicholas of Cusa's De visione dei

Sponsoring Organization(s)

American Cusanus Society

Organizer Name

Donald F. Duclow, David Albertson

Organizer Affiliation

Gwynedd Mercy Univ., Univ. of Southern California

Presider Name

Donald F. Duclow

Paper Title 1

Mystical Experience and the Neuropsychology of Self-Transformation in De visione dei

Presenter 1 Name

Andrea Hollingsworth

Presenter 1 Affiliation

School of Theology, Boston Univ.

Paper Title 2

Man as Deus Creatus: The Role of Creativity in Cusa's Image Theory

Presenter 2 Name

Susan Gottlöber

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Maynooth Univ.

Paper Title 3

Self and Sociality: Reading Cusa's De visione dei with Michel de Certeau and Jean-Luc Marion

Presenter 3 Name

Thomas A. Carlson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Santa Barbara

Start Date

14-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 213

Description

This session complements Jean-Luc Marion’s Watanabe Lecture, “The Meaning of the Icon in Nicholas of Cusa.” In the thought of both Marion and Cusanus, the “icon” is linked to the givenness of the “self”. Marion’s most recent book studies the theological orientation of the self in Augustine’s Confessions, a book that greatly influenced Cusanus’ mystical treatise, De visione Dei (1453). This session therefore poses questions concerning “selfhood” in De visione Dei. What is the self’s relation to God? What does selfhood have to do with vision or iconicity? What is the basis of the self and its reflexivity?

Donald F. Duclow

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May 14th, 3:30 PM

Selfhood in Nicholas of Cusa's De visione dei

Bernhard 213

This session complements Jean-Luc Marion’s Watanabe Lecture, “The Meaning of the Icon in Nicholas of Cusa.” In the thought of both Marion and Cusanus, the “icon” is linked to the givenness of the “self”. Marion’s most recent book studies the theological orientation of the self in Augustine’s Confessions, a book that greatly influenced Cusanus’ mystical treatise, De visione Dei (1453). This session therefore poses questions concerning “selfhood” in De visione Dei. What is the self’s relation to God? What does selfhood have to do with vision or iconicity? What is the basis of the self and its reflexivity?

Donald F. Duclow