Session Title

Medieval Data: Prospects and Practices

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Institute for Medieval Studies, Univ. of New Mexico

Organizer Name

Fred Gibbs

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of New Mexico

Presider Name

Fred Gibbs

Paper Title 1

Workflows for Medievalists with Open Data Ideals and Closed-Source Texts

Presenter 1 Name

Kalani Craig

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Indiana Univ.-Bloomington

Paper Title 2

"I sign therefore I am": Documenting Early Medieval Medici in Italian Charters, A.D. 800-1100

Presenter 2 Name

Luca Larpi

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Manchester

Paper Title 3

The Archaeology of Anglo-Norman Rural Settlement in Co. Wexford, Ireland, ca. 1169-1400

Presenter 3 Name

Brittany Rancour

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Missouri-Columbia

Paper Title 4

Pointless Maps: Spatial Analysis with Fuzzy Data

Presenter 4 Name

Amanda Morton

Presenter 4 Affiliation

George Mason Univ.

Paper Title 5

Respondent

Presenter 5 Name

Dorothy Carr Porter

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Start Date

14-5-2015 7:30 PM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

With the goal of unlocking novel and macroscopic historical perspectives, how might medievalists shift their research practices to gradually and collectively assemble diverse medieval data (demographics, charters, archaeological findings, parish records, accounts of plague, etc.) that will be inherently visible, reusable, and collectable? This panel presents the insights of four historical research projects that have grappled with both the theory and practice of how to collect, interpret, represent, and share digital data about the medieval world.

Timothy C. Graham

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
May 14th, 7:30 PM

Medieval Data: Prospects and Practices

Fetzer 1010

With the goal of unlocking novel and macroscopic historical perspectives, how might medievalists shift their research practices to gradually and collectively assemble diverse medieval data (demographics, charters, archaeological findings, parish records, accounts of plague, etc.) that will be inherently visible, reusable, and collectable? This panel presents the insights of four historical research projects that have grappled with both the theory and practice of how to collect, interpret, represent, and share digital data about the medieval world.

Timothy C. Graham