Session Title

Hoccleve Less Studied

Sponsoring Organization(s)

International Hoccleve Society

Organizer Name

Meredith Clermont-Ferrand

Organizer Affiliation

Eastern Connecticut State Univ.

Presider Name

Elon Lang

Presider Affiliation

Univ. of Texas-Austin

Paper Title 1

Counterfeiting God: A Reading of Thomas Hoccleve's Complaint and Dialogue

Presenter 1 Name

Jessica Auz

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 2

"English Deschamps": Thomas Hoccleve’s Metrical Rivalry with Chaucer

Presenter 2 Name

Nicholas Myklebust

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Regis Univ.

Paper Title 3

Hoccleve's Theoretical Iconoclasm

Presenter 3 Name

Eleanor Johnson

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Columbia Univ.

Start Date

14-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 2030

Description

We seek papers that make an effort to de-familiarize Hoccleve studies by emphasizing Hoccleve’s texts that are not normally considered to have much weight in Hoccleve scholarship, and to explore the gravitational pull they might have to Medieval Studies and Fifteenth Century Studies as a whole. In particular, by looking beyond The Regiment of Princes, this session proposes a more robust and heterogeneous perspective on the Hocclevian literary corpus. We propose that participants consider not only under-represented texts, but also resonances within the texts themselves to each other and to both modern and medieval generic and scholarly discourses. Questions to consider might include: how might Hoccleve’s (over)use of the penitential genre affect its power to console? How might the Formulary expose genre indeterminacies by disseminating seemingly contradictory forms—the bureaucratic and the artistic—in the context of fifteenth-century poetry that exposes a fundamental instability of both genres? How might Hoccleve’s translations both undermine and reinforce ideas of masculine literary identity? By engaging in this carnivalesque celebration of textual expansion, we hope to turn Hoccleve’s lesser known works into their own competitive cooperation of divergent voices within this writer’s full literary corpus.

We especially welcome paper proposals that consider Hoccleve’s lesser known works in the context of theory, manuscript dissemination, textual history and/or media studies, modes of social engagement, and connections between themes, literary devices, language, and prosody.

Meredith A. Clermont-Ferrand

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May 14th, 10:00 AM

Hoccleve Less Studied

Fetzer 2030

We seek papers that make an effort to de-familiarize Hoccleve studies by emphasizing Hoccleve’s texts that are not normally considered to have much weight in Hoccleve scholarship, and to explore the gravitational pull they might have to Medieval Studies and Fifteenth Century Studies as a whole. In particular, by looking beyond The Regiment of Princes, this session proposes a more robust and heterogeneous perspective on the Hocclevian literary corpus. We propose that participants consider not only under-represented texts, but also resonances within the texts themselves to each other and to both modern and medieval generic and scholarly discourses. Questions to consider might include: how might Hoccleve’s (over)use of the penitential genre affect its power to console? How might the Formulary expose genre indeterminacies by disseminating seemingly contradictory forms—the bureaucratic and the artistic—in the context of fifteenth-century poetry that exposes a fundamental instability of both genres? How might Hoccleve’s translations both undermine and reinforce ideas of masculine literary identity? By engaging in this carnivalesque celebration of textual expansion, we hope to turn Hoccleve’s lesser known works into their own competitive cooperation of divergent voices within this writer’s full literary corpus.

We especially welcome paper proposals that consider Hoccleve’s lesser known works in the context of theory, manuscript dissemination, textual history and/or media studies, modes of social engagement, and connections between themes, literary devices, language, and prosody.

Meredith A. Clermont-Ferrand