Session Title

Imagination

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Stanford Univ.

Organizer Name

Elaine M. Treharne

Organizer Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Presider Name

Michelle Karnes

Presider Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Paper Title 1

What Chaucer Would Have Said: Early Modern Catholic and Protestant Readers' Imagined Engagements with the Middle Ages

Presenter 1 Name

Nancy Bradley Warren

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Texas A&M Univ.

Paper Title 2

Imagination, Irrealism, and Juan Ruiz's Libro de buen amor

Presenter 2 Name

Kevin R. Poole

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Yale Univ.

Paper Title 3

"Þe Tyme of His Bodily Liuyng": Lay Devotion and the Physicality of Christ in Love's Mirror of the Blessed Life of Jesus Christ

Presenter 3 Name

Erin Kissick

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Purdue Univ.

Paper Title 4

Imagined Texts: Early Medieval Charms and Their Sources

Presenter 4 Name

Jean Abbott

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Start Date

15-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Fetzer 1010

Description

In an article from 2010, Nicholas Watson argues that our relationship to the past is imaginative, by which he means that it is dynamic, vital, and constantly renegotiated. In his view, there is a similarity between how we study the Middle Ages as a historical period and how we study literature, no matter the period. This panel will focus on how we imagine the past and how people in the Middle Ages imagined themselves through a variety of authors, genres and languages.

Elaine M. Treharne

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May 15th, 10:00 AM

Imagination

Fetzer 1010

In an article from 2010, Nicholas Watson argues that our relationship to the past is imaginative, by which he means that it is dynamic, vital, and constantly renegotiated. In his view, there is a similarity between how we study the Middle Ages as a historical period and how we study literature, no matter the period. This panel will focus on how we imagine the past and how people in the Middle Ages imagined themselves through a variety of authors, genres and languages.

Elaine M. Treharne