Session Title

Post-Conquest Religiosity

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Sarah L. Reeser, Bridget Riley

Organizer Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto, Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Presider Name

Sarah L. Reeser

Paper Title 1

Nasrid Factionalism and Christian Conversion across the Frontier: From Yusuf IV to the Heirs of Cidi Yahya Al Nayar (Don Pedro de Granada)

Presenter 1 Name

Elizabeth Ashcroft Terry

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of California-Berkeley

Paper Title 2

Stop Relying on That Body: Saint Bridget of Sweden's Disassociation with the Physical Body

Presenter 2 Name

Sara Danielle Mederos

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Lincoln

Paper Title 3

Conquering Cistercians: Savigny, Sempringham, and Obazine, ca. 1147

Presenter 3 Name

Lochin Brouillard

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Centre for Medieval Studies, Univ. of Toronto

Start Date

15-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

How was religious practice on the frontier shaped by currents of adaptation or resistance following acts of invasion and territorial expansion? What part did liturgy, hagiography, religious art, and literature play in shaping the post-conquest narrative? These are two of the questions we seek to explore in this session. Scholarship has long acknowledged the impact of conquest upon local practice and large-scale belief. Recently, there has been a growing interest in expanding the traditional boundaries of the medieval world by exploring existing issues related to conquest and religious change in new time periods and milieus. By soliciting interdisciplinary views and global perspectives, this session seeks to explore the transformation, utilization, and manipulation of religiosity and piety during and after periods of conquest in the Middle Ages.

Sarah L. Reeser and Bridget Riley

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May 15th, 1:30 PM

Post-Conquest Religiosity

Schneider 1275

How was religious practice on the frontier shaped by currents of adaptation or resistance following acts of invasion and territorial expansion? What part did liturgy, hagiography, religious art, and literature play in shaping the post-conquest narrative? These are two of the questions we seek to explore in this session. Scholarship has long acknowledged the impact of conquest upon local practice and large-scale belief. Recently, there has been a growing interest in expanding the traditional boundaries of the medieval world by exploring existing issues related to conquest and religious change in new time periods and milieus. By soliciting interdisciplinary views and global perspectives, this session seeks to explore the transformation, utilization, and manipulation of religiosity and piety during and after periods of conquest in the Middle Ages.

Sarah L. Reeser and Bridget Riley