Session Title

The Sounds of Silence

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Univ. of Glasgow

Organizer Name

Pamela King

Organizer Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Presider Name

Pamela King

Paper Title 1

The Audible Spirit: Physical Perceptions of the Sense of Hearing and Deafness in the Middle Ages

Presenter 1 Name

Jessica Legacy

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Edinburgh

Paper Title 2

"The upstart has stolen our artistry": Music, Alternative Utterance, and Courtly Deafness in the Roman de silence

Presenter 2 Name

Phoebe C. Linton

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Univ. of Edinburgh

Paper Title 3

Moveing Silence: The Speaking Body in Medieval Drama

Presenter 3 Name

Clare Wright

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Univ. of Kent

Paper Title 4

Respondent

Presenter 4 Name

Elizabeth Robertson

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Glasgow

Start Date

15-5-2015 1:30 PM

Session Location

Bernhard 205

Description

Within pre-modern studies there is a continuing interest in the history of the senses, and in corporeal performativity and reception in the arts. One trend has seen the application of theories drawn from perception psychology moving out from considering the visual to explore aurality. This session focuses specifically on the absence of, or abstention from noise, the valorising of silence. Silence in these contexts has evident gestural value. Silence is not only abstention from speech but from noise-making more generally. Moreover it has its correlative in the reception of silence and, in particular, deafness..

Pamela Margaret King

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May 15th, 1:30 PM

The Sounds of Silence

Bernhard 205

Within pre-modern studies there is a continuing interest in the history of the senses, and in corporeal performativity and reception in the arts. One trend has seen the application of theories drawn from perception psychology moving out from considering the visual to explore aurality. This session focuses specifically on the absence of, or abstention from noise, the valorising of silence. Silence in these contexts has evident gestural value. Silence is not only abstention from speech but from noise-making more generally. Moreover it has its correlative in the reception of silence and, in particular, deafness..

Pamela Margaret King