Session Title

Political/Social Action: Negotiating Complicated Work Spaces (A Roundtable)

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS)

Organizer Name

Jennifer C. Edwards

Organizer Affiliation

Manhattan College

Presider Name

Jennifer C. Edwards

Paper Title 1

Medievalist on the Island: Negotiating International Work Spaces

Presenter 1 Name

Christine E. Kozikowski

Presenter 1 Affiliation

College of the Bahamas

Paper Title 2

On Mentoring

Presenter 2 Name

Clare Monagle

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Monash Univ.

Paper Title 3

A Complicated Second Life in Academia

Presenter 3 Name

Erin L. Jordan

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Old Dominion Univ.

Paper Title 4

What's a Working-Class Girl to Do? Negotiating Gender and Class as a Junior Faculty Member

Presenter 4 Name

Lynn Arner

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Brock Univ.

Presenter 5 Name

Nahir I. Otaño Gracia

Presenter 5 Affiliation

Univ. of Pennsylvania

Start Date

15-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

Medieval Feminists at Work: Negotiating Complicated Workspaces (A Roundtable

The academic community creates a fraught and challenging workplace, with the overlapping of working, social, and personal relationships whose boundaries are not always clear, consistent, or mutually acknowledged. Expectations for undergraduates, graduate students, adjuncts, junior and senior faculty, and administrators vary by institutional culture and across the academic lifecycle. The inherent power dynamics of the academic system--wherein faculty train students, tenured faculty evaluate and determine the fate of untenured colleagues, administrators control funds and access, and undergraduate complaints compromise adjunct careers—create a perfect environment for bullying, harassment (sexual or otherwise), and abuse, particularly when complicating factors such as race, sex, disability, and age are involved. Anecdotally in personal communication, persistently in the forums of The Chronicle of Higher Education, in the #YesAllWomen twitter movement, academic women identify themselves as vulnerable to gross manipulations of power within these dynamics. Yet, despite the increase in institutional mechanisms to deal with abuse, many female academics find it impractical, even career suicide, to formally complain about these problems. Medievalists, moreover, are often the only premodern specialist in their department or even campus and so lack the community support of other fields. Panelists on this roundtable will examine the complications medievalist women have experienced in the academic workplace as well as feminist methods for addressing issues and creating a safe, healthy, and functioning workspace.

Dorothy Kim

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May 15th, 3:30 PM

Political/Social Action: Negotiating Complicated Work Spaces (A Roundtable)

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Medieval Feminists at Work: Negotiating Complicated Workspaces (A Roundtable

The academic community creates a fraught and challenging workplace, with the overlapping of working, social, and personal relationships whose boundaries are not always clear, consistent, or mutually acknowledged. Expectations for undergraduates, graduate students, adjuncts, junior and senior faculty, and administrators vary by institutional culture and across the academic lifecycle. The inherent power dynamics of the academic system--wherein faculty train students, tenured faculty evaluate and determine the fate of untenured colleagues, administrators control funds and access, and undergraduate complaints compromise adjunct careers—create a perfect environment for bullying, harassment (sexual or otherwise), and abuse, particularly when complicating factors such as race, sex, disability, and age are involved. Anecdotally in personal communication, persistently in the forums of The Chronicle of Higher Education, in the #YesAllWomen twitter movement, academic women identify themselves as vulnerable to gross manipulations of power within these dynamics. Yet, despite the increase in institutional mechanisms to deal with abuse, many female academics find it impractical, even career suicide, to formally complain about these problems. Medievalists, moreover, are often the only premodern specialist in their department or even campus and so lack the community support of other fields. Panelists on this roundtable will examine the complications medievalist women have experienced in the academic workplace as well as feminist methods for addressing issues and creating a safe, healthy, and functioning workspace.

Dorothy Kim