Session Title

Movement in Medieval Literature

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Special Session

Organizer Name

Rebecca Straple

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ.

Presider Name

Rebecca Straple

Paper Title 1

Dramatic Entries: How to Fit God, Jesus, and the Holy Ghost into Mary's Body in the N-Town Salutation and Conception

Presenter 1 Name

Daisy Black

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Hull

Paper Title 2

Movement, Dependence, and the Narrator of Petrus Alfonsi's Disciplina clericalis

Presenter 2 Name

Gabriel Ford

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Davidson College

Paper Title 3

Romancing the Dance: Afterlives of Performance in Le Roman de la rose

Presenter 3 Name

Kathryn Dickason

Presenter 3 Affiliation

Stanford Univ.

Start Date

15-5-2015 3:30 PM

Session Location

Schneider 1275

Description

Aside from a set of sessions on Movement and Meaning in Art and Architecture at the 42nd International Medieval Congress at Kalamazoo sponsored by Giovanni Fredi and Nino Zchomelidse, there have been few sessions addressing movement of any kind at the Congress, and none that have addressed movement in literature specifically. Papers in this session address the movement of dance, drama, and storytelling in medieval texts from England, France, and Spain. With the strong and consistently growing interest in medieval studies in bodies, their capabilities and limitations, and the medieval conception of such, this session on movement in medieval literature will hopefully be a valuable outlet for new perspectives on this topic and spark conversations about new ways to study the medieval body, ritual, and communication.

Rebecca Straple

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May 15th, 3:30 PM

Movement in Medieval Literature

Schneider 1275

Aside from a set of sessions on Movement and Meaning in Art and Architecture at the 42nd International Medieval Congress at Kalamazoo sponsored by Giovanni Fredi and Nino Zchomelidse, there have been few sessions addressing movement of any kind at the Congress, and none that have addressed movement in literature specifically. Papers in this session address the movement of dance, drama, and storytelling in medieval texts from England, France, and Spain. With the strong and consistently growing interest in medieval studies in bodies, their capabilities and limitations, and the medieval conception of such, this session on movement in medieval literature will hopefully be a valuable outlet for new perspectives on this topic and spark conversations about new ways to study the medieval body, ritual, and communication.

Rebecca Straple