Session Title

Eat, Play, Teach: Medieval Food and Foodways in the Classroom

Sponsoring Organization(s)

Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages; TEAMS (The Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages)

Organizer Name

John A. Bollweg

Organizer Affiliation

Western Michigan Univ./College of DuPage

Presider Name

Gael Grossman

Presider Affiliation

Jamestown Community College

Paper Title 1

Quests, Quails, and Custards: Food in Life and Literature

Presenter 1 Name

Lisa Shugert Bevevino

Presenter 1 Affiliation

Univ. of Minnesota-Morris

Paper Title 2

Anthropological Approaches to Teaching Food in the Middle Ages

Presenter 2 Name

Dianne Burke Moneypenny

Presenter 2 Affiliation

Indiana Univ. East

Paper Title 3

An Anthropological Archaeological Perspective on Medieval Food

Presenter 3 Name

Scott D. Stull

Presenter 3 Affiliation

SUNY-Cortland

Paper Title 4

Traveling Food: Using Peripatetic Foodways to Understand the Medieval Past

Presenter 4 Name

Samantha A. Meigs

Presenter 4 Affiliation

Univ. of Indianapolis

Start Date

16-5-2015 10:00 AM

Session Location

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Description

Food and foodways are simultaneously familiar and novel. The getting, preparation, and consumption of food are universal cultural practices, and so are familiar to the student, while their specific cultural expression (including symbolic, ritual and ascetic practices) can be novel and engaging. For this session Mens et Mensa and TEAMS seek papers presenting examples of how instructors have used medieval food and foodways (including literature, trade, cuisine, and religious thought) to engage students and illuminate the culture of the Middle Ages.

John A. Bollweg

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May 16th, 10:00 AM

Eat, Play, Teach: Medieval Food and Foodways in the Classroom

Valley III Stinson Lounge

Food and foodways are simultaneously familiar and novel. The getting, preparation, and consumption of food are universal cultural practices, and so are familiar to the student, while their specific cultural expression (including symbolic, ritual and ascetic practices) can be novel and engaging. For this session Mens et Mensa and TEAMS seek papers presenting examples of how instructors have used medieval food and foodways (including literature, trade, cuisine, and religious thought) to engage students and illuminate the culture of the Middle Ages.

John A. Bollweg